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  1. #11

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    Thanks for the offer steve but I do not see a lot that catches my fancy in the mag. I flip through it when I am where they sell it but have not bought one in a few years. One article is not enough to justify money that could be better spent on film and or Family, not necessarily in that order.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #12
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    I shoot a lot of 4x10. Personally, I love it. I bought the 4x10 back for my 8x10, I can use a 90mm Schneider Super Angulon XL and get some fantastic reaches on the negatives.

    I can enlarge them on my 8x10 enlarger with a mask I had made that gives me a 2x enlargement, which is nice at 8x20.

    I bought the film holders from Keith Canham, $95 each, pricey but worth it. I have 6 and they are fairly easy to change in a small tent, but usually last me the day. If I get really hard up for a 4x10 I just use the center of an 8x10 piece of film.

    Using a half slide on film is dangerous especially on larger film. Sliding a half slide in causes the light baffles on the film holder to split and not having anything on the lower half to protect the film can cause a light leak across the entire sheet.
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  3. #13

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    I've shot a little bit of 4x10 with a splitter board in an 8x10 camera. Actually it was a piece of sheet metal that I cut to fit the grooves in the camera back made for this purpose. I used 8x10 film & holders and just kept track with masking tape & pencil on each side of the holders. I wrote n+, n, n-2, etc on the tape. I then waited to use the other half for similar sbr conditions. Most times I didn't have a problem exposing both halves during an outing. I did process a few, though, with only one half exposed.

  4. #14

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    Sep 2002
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    Let's see, spend 25.00 and get a two part article on 4x10 cameras, lenses, etc. and have them as a permanent reference or don't spend 25.00 and potentially spend several hours on the interent and possibly not get as good and comprehensive info. You must like spending time on the computer and have unlimited free time.

    steve simmons

  5. #15

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    Mark,

    I've shot 4x10 in the past and am about to return to it again. It is large enough to be contact printed and also small enough to enlarge if that is of interest. When I first started shooting 4x10 I looked at the cut dark slide idea, but did not like the idea of having to remember which half had been shot. Also in wide angle images I wanted to use the center of the lens coverage rather then having to shift the lens up and down. I chose to add new film guides down the middle of older 8x10 holders. I modified three holders this way and they worked great for a number of years, I'm having to rebuild them now as they got a little worn. Working with 4x10 in the 8x10 camera was great because of being able to rotate the camera back for a verticle shot. Something that is still a problem for my 8x20.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  6. #16
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve simmons
    Let's see, spend 25.00 and get a two part article on 4x10 cameras, lenses, etc. and have them as a permanent reference or don't spend 25.00 and potentially spend several hours on the interent and possibly not get as good and comprehensive info. You must like spending time on the computer and have unlimited free time.

    steve simmons
    amazing level of politeness. really.

  7. #17
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    Paul Strand was reported to have done this with his 5X7 camera.
    Strand cut off an inch of the long dimension of his 5 x 7s because he thought they were not square enough. His 5 x 6 (aspect ratio of .83) format is not even close to the golden section.

  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall
    Using a half slide on film is dangerous especially on larger film. Sliding a half slide in causes the light baffles on the film holder to split and not having anything on the lower half to protect the film can cause a light leak across the entire sheet.
    This is not true. The half-darkslide shouldn't be cut entirely in half, but in an "L" shape, so that the light trap functions just as it would with a normal darkslide. You can see a picture of one at www.benderphoto.com.

    To avoid the processing mismatch issue, just don't expose two halves of the same sheet in a way that requires each half to have different processing. That's what I do. You just have to be careful to keep track of which half of the sheet is exposed. I recommend Post-it notes for this purpose.

    The downside of this method is that you might not always have enough front rise/fall (or shift for verticals) to get the lens where you want it with respect to the half of the sheet you want to expose, particularly with short lenses, depending on the design of your camera and bellows.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #19

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    Since one of the reasons I picked up the 8x10 is because I would like to do some 4x10's I have really enjoyed this thread. My original intention was to just take a darkslide and cut the viewable part in half (leaving the section for the light trap intact to avoid the light leak there). But the idea of making a 4x10 back sounds interesting (hope some of the LF camera makers are reading this...hint, hint) and then Don Millers comment about cutting a darkslide down to ... what was it 6.125 x 10 I think, that really appeals to me, since I am very fond of the 5x7 perspective. Just happen to have some older, wood film holders that need some repair work anyway, so that might be a good way to update one of them. Still use one 8x10 sheet, but might be worth it, and use some of the JandC 8x10 that is not as expensive as the Efke.

    Thanks for the thread Mark, and to everyone else for their input...proof again there is much to learn, and lost of folks here willing to share.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  10. #20

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    Get an 8x10 camera with sliders that will give you two 4x10 per sheet of film---less hassle than butchering dark slides. Look for an old Agfa/Ansco or 'dorff---some came with sliders, some didn't so ask questions.

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