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  1. #1
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    The Petzval Madness Continues...

    Last night, Liz and I did a banquet portrait gig. It's sort of like doing prom pictures, but for adults. The event was for the St Barbara's Day celebration (the Patron Saint of the Field Artillery), and we posed couples in front of the fireplace in the officer's club. Shot it in medium format (Bronica SQ-Ai) and 3 lights. A piece of cake gig with good reward$.

    Anyway, we knew that we'd have some down-time during the event, so I brought along the 5X7 Eastman and the 10" Petzval so I could shoot some pix of Liz while the attendees were doing their (wacky) ceremonial stuff. I shot 6 sheets of 5X7 J&C 200. The first 2 have been souped and I'm rather happy with the results. Here is a scan of sheet #2.

    I'm going to make some waterhouse stops (for f/8, f/11, and f/16) so I can get a touch more depth of field. I used a 4X N.D. filter to get the exposure in the ballpark. The film was souped in Microdol-X 1:3 for 16.5 minutes @ 68F in a Unidrum. I probably could cut back the development to 15 minutes (which I'll do on the next 2 sheets) to lower the contrast a bit.

    Jim G. - You really have created a monster! (but Liz loves the results).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Liz-_02.jpg  
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  2. #2

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    Acute Galli syndrome is quite contagious, I've been feeling the symptoms myself as of late. If not not treated properly it can lead to the chronic version.

  3. #3

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    Nice shot by the way.

  4. #4
    Ole
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    I know those symptoms. But as long as Aplanats cost a fraction of a Petzval (my latest aquisition is a "Portrait Rectigraphic 18x16"), I'll leave the Petzvals to Jim. But don't quote me; I've been blamed for driving up the prices of old Angulons on German Ebay - and I've only ever bought ONE there!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    I know those symptoms. But as long as Aplanats cost a fraction of a Petzval (my latest aquisition is a "Portrait Rectigraphic 18x16"), I'll leave the Petzvals to Jim. But don't quote me; I've been blamed for driving up the prices of old Angulons on German Ebay - and I've only ever bought ONE there!
    That's my other weakness... the Rapid Rectilinear. Been building up a nice collection over the past couple of years!
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  6. #6
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    I am under the assumption that the Aplanat/Rapid Rectilinear design evolved from the Petzvals. The rear doublet is air-spaced in the Petzvals and cemented in the Aplanats/RRs, and the latter have less curvature of field. Still, the RR design provides for a sharp center with a rapid falloff in sharpness towards the edges, but not as extreme as the the Petzvals. They also tend to be less expen$ive. Are these assumptions correct?

    Joe

  7. #7

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    With all these APUG goings-on with brass lenses, I now have a defensible reason to give my wife. The next time she sarcastically asks why I keep accumulating brass lenses, I can tell her that its actually a disease with a well-documented name, one that I caught early on and still have not recovered from. And that given the tenacity of the syndrome and its strong associations with large cameras with bellows, folks with even the most sturdy constitutions often fall into severe periods of relapse.

  8. #8
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz
    I am under the assumption that the Aplanat/Rapid Rectilinear design evolved from the Petzvals.
    ....
    Are these assumptions correct?
    Not really. Petzval calculated the lens to give acceptable sharpness with a lot of speed - f:3.5 was a great improvement over the f:16 landscape lenses!

    The Aplanat/RR was calculated independently to give a flat field over a larger image circle than the Petzval - it was made to do the job that Petzval lenses couldn't. It was probably based on the Grubb aplanatic landscape lens, a double cemented meniscus. Making this into a symmetric "double doublet" flattened the field, eliminated distortion, and allowed increased aperture up to f:7.2 or thereabout.

    According to Kingslake there is reason to believe that Steinheil may have calculated the lens, while Dallmeyer used the more familiar empiric method of putting two Grubb lenses together to see what would happen.

    One of my "brass cannons" happens to be what I believe must be one of the very first Steinheil Aplanats - it's marked "Steinheil in München Patent", with no mention of "Aplanat" which it definitely is - and it's a very fine lens. It is every bit as sharp as much later Aplanat lenses, so Steinheil must have got it right in the first try!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #9
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    Something, I'll never understand. I prefer the newest, sharpest lenses I can get.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Something, I'll never understand. I prefer the newest, sharpest lenses I can get.
    You don't need anything else to get the desireable sharp center fuzzy rest of image effect IF your sharp modern lens doesn't have a field stop built-in. Just use a sharp modern lens that doesn't cover the format you're shooting on. Practice lens abuse, like the others. Pretend that "illuminates" means "covers."

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