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Thread: Carbon Infinity

  1. #31
    edwinfechter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    It was a (mistaken) rumor. The external measurements are the same, but the Ci has an off-centre "peg" lock. And different corner curvature, as well.

    This is what I found out after some searching: there were Sinar to Carbon Infinty lensboard adapters (a recent Carbon Infinity sale from a shop in Italy included one). Ditto for bellows. This might have started the rumors that the Carbon Infinity takes Sinar lensboards. These lensboard adapters machined by Carbon Infinity Ltd. are rarer still than the camera itself.

    Ole, I'll send you pics as soon as I get hold of one of these adapters if you have use for them.


    Cheers,

    Edwin

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwinfechter
    This is what I found out after some searching: there were Sinar to Carbon Infinty lensboard adapters (a recent Carbon Infinity sale from a shop in Italy included one). Ditto for bellows. This might have started the rumors that the Carbon Infinity takes Sinar lensboards. These lensboard adapters machined by Carbon Infinity Ltd. are rarer still than the camera itself.

    Ole, I'll send you pics as soon as I get hold of one of these adapters if you have use for them.


    Cheers,

    Edwin
    Hi Edwin,

    Since I have seen on the internet estimates of between 30 and about 60 Carbon Infinities having been made, I would say that the lensboard adapters must be really rare.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  3. #33

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    I must say, that is one ridiculously funny looking camera! I cannot read any of that review, but judging by it's looks...it seems like it was designed by a space engineer rather than a photographer. You will have to let us know how "user friendly" it is in the field, and how using it compares to other normal 4x5 cameras.

  4. #34
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Way to go Ole!

    IMHO probably the most well designed 4 x 5 .... all the studio - mono rail movements in a compact field camera! State of the art and beautiful to behold!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by naturephoto1
    Hi Edwin,

    Since I have seen on the internet estimates of between 30 and about 60 Carbon Infinities having been made, I would say that the lensboard adapters must be really rare.

    Rich
    Rich,

    There were a total of 120 cameras made before they closed shop. Although at that number they are are still quite rare. There are accesories that are rarer still including the bullhide bag, bellow lens hood that attaches to the nodal point mount, and the Studio kit (basically a monorail extension that more than doubles the focal length that can be used with the camera.

    Ryan,

    Here is a short review I made with some tech specs:

    Carbon Infinity View Camera

    Adrian Thompson and Barry Noble, designers of the Team Philips boat, designed the Carbon Infinity as the first and only 4”x5” large format camera made from, practically, all carbon fibre components. Eighty-five percent of this camera is made of carbon fiber, the other materials are titanium and aluminum alloy. It was unique in its ability to fold like a field camera into its own compact carbon fiber base yet achieves movements found in monorail cameras.

    Though quite a few are turned off by the weight of the camera (3.3 kg), one must understand that the designed aimed to satisfy requirements of stability, full and yaw-free movements, durability and portability. As such the carbon fiber components used are thick solid constructions. An all aluminum construction following the same design and similar strength requirements would’ve been much heavier.

    Carbon-fiber composites weigh about one-fifth as much as steel, but can be comparable or better in terms of stiffness and strength, depending on fiber grade and orientation. These composites do not rust or corrode like steel or aluminum. The problem is that carbon-fiber composites cost at least 20 times as much as steel, 5 times more as aluminum. Production of carbon fiber and of the actual composites is labor intensive, slow and expensive.

    This explains the high cost (£ 3500 / US$ 6,000) of the Carbon Infinity camera when it was launched in 1990. When the company ceased production In 1994, a total of 120 Carbon Infinity cameras produced.

    Even today, manufacture of products with high-grade carbon fiber components remain out of reach for mass production. With the current worldwide shortage in carbon fiber and with current supplies biased for aerospace applications, reviving this dream of a camera will remain a dream.

    Technical Specifications

    • Movements: Carbon Infinity has virtually unlimited movement, and totally yaw free, matching and perhaps exceeding those of studio based monorails.

    Front Rise: 5.1 cm

    Front Fall: 5.2 cm

    Front Base Tilt: 90º (marked up to 40º)

    Front Axial Tilt: Bellows limited; A 7.5 cm long nodal point mount gives the possibility of lens tilts on the correct nodal point of any lens.

    Front Shift: 7.1 cm (right), 1.6 (left); The front standard can be rotated to provide a left shift of 7.1 cm.

    Front Swing: Bellows limited

    Rear Rise: 7.1 cm

    Rear Fall: 3 cm

    Rear Base Tilt: 90º (marked up to 40º)

    Rear Axial Tilt: on film plane, bellows limited

    Rear Shift: 6.1 cm (right), 2.5 cm (left)

    Rear Swing: on film plane, bellows limited

    • Bellows
    Maximum Extension: 54 cm (Standard Bellows)

    Minimum Extension: 3 cm

    Bellows Options: Standard or Wide-Angle Bellows

    Front Bellows Opening: 8.4 cm x 8.4 cm

    Lens board Size: 11.4 with locking pin
    • Film Back
    Film Back: Horizontal & Vertical International Back

    Ground Glass: Bosscreen for Carbon Infinity

    • Focusing rails run smoothly on precision rail bearings.

    Coarse Focusing: Slider on two parallel rails with positive push button lock

    Focus mechanism: Independent Rack and Pinion with a lever clutch lock on front and rear standards
    • Closed Dimension: 26 cm x 27 cm x 11 cm

    • Weight: 3.3 kilos

    • Other Specs
    Tripod Socket: 2x 3/8

    Locking pin on lens board, bellows, and film back attach to spring loaded lock on the front and back frames

    Spirit Levels: Horizontal & Vertical on Front Frame and Rear Frame; Horizontal on both standards

    Materials: Carbon Fiber, Titanium, Aluminum

    One Lens (up to compact 210 mm) can be kept inside the camera case when folded.

    4 titanium pegs on the film back act as a universal holder for reflex viewing accessories from other manufacturers.
    • Accessories:
    Bellows Lens Hood System with jointed rod and three Hi-Tech filter slots for use with bag bellows. Bellows lens hood system attaches to the nodal point mount.

    Studio Kit consisting of a base rail, square bellows, standard with nodal point adjustment, and frame for longer bellows extensions. (If you think the camera itself is rare try looking for this one )

    Black leather case (Not all cameras shipped with the leather case)

    Resources:
    Carbon Infinity Set-Up Instructions
    Louis Shu of Photo Gizzmo
    Ken Hansen Photographic Price List & Advertisement
    John Hannavy Review
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails carboninfinitystudiokit.jpg   Infinity_Camera.jpg  

  6. #36

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    Hi Ole
    AS a footnote to the comprehensive info supplied, the cameras were made/sold from a small village called Ipplepen here in Devon.
    Tell us how you get on.
    regards
    Alex

  7. #37
    Ole
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    Alex, that was Edwin Fechter supplying all that info, not me.

    So far my experience with the camera is limited - I've been concentrating on getting some usable LARGE BW negatives whenever I've had the time.

    But in my limited experience, this is the first camera I've ever used that is completely "transparent": When you're working with focus and shifts, tilts and swings you can forget the camera entirely and just work on the image directly. The locking mechanisms are very precise, and can be set to whatever resistance you desire. A light touch is enough to lock any movement, it takes only a little more to unlock. All controls are exactly where I believe they are, so there's no need to get out from under the darkcloth or fumbling blindly about to find the controls.

    I brought a wide selection of lenses with me for a "shootout" - 65mm Ilex Acugon, 90mm Super-Angulon, 121mm Leitmeyr Weitwinkel-Anastigmat, 150mm APO-Lanthar, 150mm Germinar-W, 165mm Angulon, 180mm Symmar, 210mm f:6.1 Xenar, 240mm Symmar, 355mm G-Claron.
    While I didn't use all the lenses I used enough to get a good test of the capabilities of the camera, especially with regards to movements. Pointing the 355mm up at a treetop, then returning both standards to vertical was - surprisingly easy. And I was near the edge of the coverage, too! Same with the 165mm Angulon, which I brought along as a "brightish normalish lens with lots and lots of coverage": The lens runs out of coverage before the camera runs out of movements.

    In short: I like it! It's perfect for me, with vertical landscapes and rough terrain (even my own garden has rough terrain, I use a safety rope when picking blackcurrants)!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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