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  1. #11
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Brad, the device in the upper left of your photo is , like Jim Galli says, a solenoid to trip the shutter. The solenoid doesn't fire the flash. A switch on the flashgun fires both the solenoid and the flash. There are also contacts in the shutter to fire a flash. An adjustment at about the 5 o'clock position of the face of the shutter changes a delay in the shutter for either F or M class flash bulbs. The shutter wasn't designed to fire electronic flash, but altering it to do so is fairly easy. The two posts near the flash adjustment are the flash contacts.

  2. #12
    Brad Bireley's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone!
    More questions to come!




    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones
    Brad, the device in the upper left of your photo is , like Jim Galli says, a solenoid to trip the shutter. The solenoid doesn't fire the flash. A switch on the flashgun fires both the solenoid and the flash. There are also contacts in the shutter to fire a flash. An adjustment at about the 5 o'clock position of the face of the shutter changes a delay in the shutter for either F or M class flash bulbs. The shutter wasn't designed to fire electronic flash, but altering it to do so is fairly easy. The two posts near the flash adjustment are the flash contacts.

  3. #13
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones
    Brad, the device in the upper left of your photo is , like Jim Galli says, a solenoid to trip the shutter. The solenoid doesn't fire the flash. A switch on the flashgun fires both the solenoid and the flash. There are also contacts in the shutter to fire a flash. An adjustment at about the 5 o'clock position of the face of the shutter changes a delay in the shutter for either F or M class flash bulbs. The shutter wasn't designed to fire electronic flash, but altering it to do so is fairly easy. The two posts near the flash adjustment are the flash contacts.
    Having gone away and looked at the shutter on my Speed Graphic I have discovered it is a SUPERMATIC X shutter - ie strobes only yet it has the same style of flash contacts. According to the CAMEROSITY (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0) system the lens on my camera has the letters ES on it - meaning the lens was made in 1947 - if it is the original lens on my camera then it dates it to the first year of Pacemaker Speed Graphic production! Using the CAMEROSITY system it should be possible to find out the age of the lens as well as finding out approximately when the Supermatics changed from F or M sync to X sync.

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan

  4. #14
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    Having gone away and looked at the shutter on my Speed Graphic I have discovered it is a SUPERMATIC X shutter - ie strobes only yet it has the same style of flash contacts. According to the CAMEROSITY (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0) system the lens on my camera has the letters ES on it - meaning the lens was made in 1947 - if it is the original lens on my camera then it dates it to the first year of Pacemaker Speed Graphic production! Using the CAMEROSITY system it should be possible to find out the age of the lens as well as finding out approximately when the Supermatics changed from F or M sync to X sync.

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan
    You are certainly right. I misread X for M. The old F-M and X shutters may have been produced concurrently for some time. The X shutter might be preferred for studio strobes, but the F-M sync was still needed for photojournalism.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    One more thing. On the top left (photographer's left) corner of the body near the back there may be a very small catch, which allows you to release and rotate the back. I don't know if all B&J Press cameras have a rotating back, but mine does.
    Mine doesn't. BTW, I do prefer it over the Speed Graphic I used to have. The metal body is much more useful in an emeregency - wheel chock for a 747, for instance, and it will leave a bigger dent when dropped on pretty much anything.

    On a more serious note, if yours is like mine, you'll find out that the front can drop about 15 degrees below horizontal. This is good. Ignore it for now - use it as a big point and shoot for the first little bit, then play with the movements.
    The Kiev 88: Mamiya's key to success in Ukraine.

    Photography without film is like Macroeconomics without reading goat entrails, and look at the mess that got us into.

  6. #16
    MattCarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JiminKyiv
    Mine doesn't. BTW, I do prefer it over the Speed Graphic I used to have. The metal body is much more useful in an emeregency - wheel chock for a 747, for instance, and it will leave a bigger dent when dropped on pretty much anything.

    On a more serious note, if yours is like mine, you'll find out that the front can drop about 15 degrees below horizontal. This is good. Ignore it for now - use it as a big point and shoot for the first little bit, then play with the movements.
    I don't really know what the drop bed is used for. I put a 75mm lens on my B&J Press. The bed was not in the view even in the normal position.

    Matt

  7. #17

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    Drop bed

    Quote Originally Posted by MattCarey
    I don't really know what the drop bed is used for. I put a 75mm lens on my B&J Press. The bed was not in the view even in the normal position.

    Matt
    I've never seen one of the B&J Press cameras but maybe the drop bed is used for front fall. btw I should be getting my Crown Graphic today. I think I'm feeling ill-I better go home this afternoon, I don't want anyone I work with to get sick

    Scott

  8. #18
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    Having gone away and looked at the shutter on my Speed Graphic I have discovered it is a SUPERMATIC X shutter - ie strobes only yet it has the same style of flash contacts. According to the CAMEROSITY (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0) system the lens on my camera has the letters ES on it - meaning the lens was made in 1947 - if it is the original lens on my camera then it dates it to the first year of Pacemaker Speed Graphic production! Using the CAMEROSITY system it should be possible to find out the age of the lens as well as finding out approximately when the Supermatics changed from F or M sync to X sync.

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan
    The lens date may not be a good indicator of when the synch changed. The Supermatic my 1944 Ektar is in is also X-sync, but was probably adjusted at some point in its life. Has a PC contact too, so apparently there were many options, including no synch, which is what the rest of my 1940's shutters have.

  9. #19
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    My Busch has a drop front for fall, as in rise/fall, it's a great feature. It allows for "forward" tilt of the front also on mine as my front standard has backward tilt. You drop the front and you get the "fall" and "tilt" controls.

    Have fun

    Curt

  10. #20
    Curt's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention that "shift" left or right is available on some by moving the front upright, at the base, by hand to the right or left. Mine has a phenolic "brake" so it's just a physical sliding movement with no locks. When adjusted properly, as it is now, it stays in place when moved. Suprising that these cameras have the movements they do.

    Curt

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