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  1. #11
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darinwc
    For some reason I didnt like the 300mm focal length. I just got a 360mm and it feels just right.
    Which lens and shutter did you purchase?

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  2. #12
    juan's Avatar
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    Clyde Butcher uses wide angle lenses specifically to pull people into his photographs. I've seen photographs of him working, and he gets amazingly close to his subjects. He says he uses 121mm on an 8x10 and has the equivalent focal length for his other formats so he can get the same type of image regardless of format.

    As for getting closer, a lot of us could improve many of our photos by taking a few steps in.
    juan

  3. #13

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    "He says he uses 121mm on an 8x10"

    That's pretty wide and no small trick to use effectively. I used to have a Kodak D2 7x11 (its quirky format appealed to me) and sometimes I'd throw a 110mm on it just for kicks. When lining up the shot, I had to be careful not to get my ears in it ...that sucker was wiiiiiiide!

  4. #14
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    It seems to me that personal "visions" differ - some prefer wide lenses, others long. And, that may change between formats. Regardless of one's focal length preference, it's still important to pay attention to what's on the GG, though.

    I forget who (in reference to 35mm RF photos) made the comment, "If your pictures aren't good enough, you aren't close enough." The same thought easily applies to LF work, too.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  5. #15
    darinwc's Avatar
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    "Which lens and shutter did you purchase?"

    I ended up with an Apo Artar 14" in an Ilex #4 shutter.
    The #4 shutter is big, but not huge, it's a close fit on a 4x4 lensboard.

  6. #16
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juan
    ... As for getting closer, a lot of us could improve many of our photos by taking a few steps in.
    juan
    I agree, Juan. I became really enamored with wide angles at one time. I have 28s and even a 19mm for 35mm, and 55s for 120. I used to use them most of the time.

    I am currently in the middle of a project that would tend to call for these lenses (buildings and architecture). However, as I look at my contact sheets, I see more and more negs where I should have just gotten closer, and/or used a longer lens. My shots of the whole building (inside or out) are fine with the wides, but details of the buildings tend to have too much "stuff" surrounding the "detail". I should get closer! It's been a revelation.

    Cheers, y'all.

  7. #17

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    I hate to quote Ansel Adams as I am not a huge fan but his description of lens focal lengths really sums it up for me.. the focal length really determines how much stuff (not his words) you want in background. You might do better to look up his explanation in "The Camera".
    art is about managing compromise

  8. #18

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    Over the years I have made most of my exposures with moderate telephotos. In fact I imagine that I have made less then twenty exposures total in the last twenty years with my 90 SA. I always found wides to be difficult for me to use. Recently I have begun using the 90 with a vengeance. Yes getting closer is vital, in my experience, and furthermore they do seem to draw one into the image.

  9. #19
    Ole
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    I hardly ever used WA until I started with LF - or rather, until I started with 5x7"! Only when I got a camera big enough to see the whole picture, did I start using really wide lenses. So a 90mm on 5x7", 121mm on 8x10", 150 on 9.5x12" and 210mm on 12x16" are what I use about half the time. Interestingly it's spread to the smaller formats as well, so I now use 18 and 21mm on 35mm, and 40mm on 120...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #20

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    For all those commenting on wides "drawing you in," why do you suppose that is? Is there more to it than the almost inevitable inclusion of the ground at the bottom of the shot, placing the viewer in the scene as opposed to distantly viewing it?

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