Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,832   Posts: 1,582,358   Online: 935
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    N.E. Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    18
    I have a similar question, when did banquet cameras become ultra-large format?

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,576
    Images
    27
    Beats me, but figure that it's not Large Format unless it takes a pack animal to haul the gear to where you want to make the image (you know like Curtis and O'Sullivan did - with those BIG glass plates, boy would I like to have one of those negatives)
    Mike C

    Rambles

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,379
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Yee
    I have a similar question, when did banquet cameras become ultra-large format?
    Similarly, I also had a question.

    http://largeformatphotography.info/l...ic/505406.html

    I think banquet cameras became ULF when the silly term was invented, apparently 1982ish. Right about when 11x14 got unceremoniously lumped in that category.


    Wayne

  4. #14
    athanasius80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Huntington Beach, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    639
    Images
    15
    Well ULF is a nicer term than "friggin huge" which is an apt description for 11x14 too.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    284
    when people got cars to transport them..
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    527
    Images
    11
    While you may find an occasional use of the term "Large Format" in older literature, the use to describe 4x5 and other sheet film sizes didn't come into general use until the 1980s, and "Ultra Large Format" until the 1990s. Probably a convenient necessity for such magazines as Photo Techniques and Darkroom Photography when using these sizes became the exception rather than the rule among photographers.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,551
    Bill, IIRC, there was a column in MP in the '70's (Sint's View?) where "large format" was often applied to 4x5. But I could be mistaken.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,266
    After reading the ULF forum 4x5 is starting to feel quite small, MF is feeling even smaller, and 35mm is teeny-tiny. My father-in-law was the last 110 user on the face of the earth... I can't even see those negs.

    Maybe it's my eye sight... maybe it's an inferiority complex... who knows, but there's some alteration of perspective going on!

  9. #19
    joneil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    75
    Images
    6
    Speaking of 110 format, I remember "PhotoHuts" and the 110 point and shoot format becomming popular roughly at the same time. That's the first time I remember hearing the term "large format" myself. Late 70's, early 80's was it?

    joe

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    659

    Look at the Graphic Press Cameras!

    It's amazing to me how long photojournalists used the 4x5 Graphics as opposed to the smaller formats that were available at the time.
    These smaller cameras would have (and eventually did) make press photography much easier but these hardy souls stuck with the 4x5 format to ensure the quality of their work. Hmmm... these guys would make great....APUGgers!

    The last Crown Graphic was built in 1973.
    "A certain amount of contempt for the material employed to express an idea is indispensable to the purest realization of this idea." Man Ray

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin