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  1. #31
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by athanasius80
    Good suggestion DBP but it raises some problems. There are 6x9cm sheet film cameras, and you can't handhold a 5x7 field camera (yes I tried it once) easily. From what I've seen, vernacular usage has 3x4 to 8x10 sheet film being large format and ultra large kicks in at 11x14. Just my thoughts.
    Objection!

    You can handhold a 5x7" - just as easily as a 4x5".

    As to LF / ULF, I wonder where that leaves my 9.5x12" plate camera? Smaller than 11x14", larger than 8x10"...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  2. #32

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    In comparison to 2-1/4X3-1/4, which once was called miniature?

  3. #33
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    I stand corrected, but I will not hand hold my 5x7 view camera unless I have a volunteer to catch it when I drop the thing. :0)

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    I'll suggest that large format begins when you start using sheet film and ULF starts when the cameras become too big to handhold.

    This sounds about right!! I guess I'll go for this. Unless somebody doesn't agree........

  5. #35

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    In the days of Purchase Tax in Britain, the largest 'amateur' format was quarter plate (3-1/4 x 4-1/4 inch, often known as 3x4 in the US, presumably because that's the approximate image size), while 4x5 inch was 'professional' and therefore exempt.

    In the 30s 120 and smaller roll-film and 35mm were lumped together as 'miniature' and this usage survived well into the 1950s. It was still in use among a few diehards in the early 1960s.

    Cheers,

    Roger

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