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  1. #1
    darinwc's Avatar
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    When did large format become 'large'

    Back in the days, what we call 'large format' was actually the 'normal' format. and all those silly roll folms were the 'miniature' formats.

    So does anyone have a clue as to when the public view of the 4x5, 5x7, and 8x10, and similar formats became too big and the 135 and 120 roll films went from being 'miniature' to 'normal'? I know some people here have hordes of old literature.

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I would imagine, back about the time that Kodak came out with the Brownie Roll Film Cameras..

    At least that is what some of the magazine articles I have refer to way back when.

    Dave

  3. #3

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    There was a time when 4x5 was medium format. There is no date but the usefullness of smaller formats increased as film got better.

    You would be better served to look at the milestones of film; thin-film, anti scatter dyes, tabular grain, two electron....
    art is about managing compromise

  4. #4

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    I always thought that Large format became large when Leica put 35mm cine film in a camera and called it miniature.

  5. #5
    David Brown's Avatar
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    April 3, 1947.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  6. #6
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown
    April 3, 1947.
    david would know.... he used to work for the IRS.

    lol

  7. #7

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    I believe that it became large when A. Adams first used expanded development.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    When I started buying lenses for it

  9. #9
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    1959. Intro Nikon F
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  10. #10
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    The consensus a century ago was that 8x10 was the smallest "professional" size, the smaller ones were "amateur." Early rollfilm wasn't as good as dryplate, so I would gather that large format in the modern sense (sheet film at 6x9cm or bigger) emerged as consumer photography abandoned plate cameras for rollfilm. There's probably not a specific date, but I would guess you could see the change by the mid-1930s where the Leica and Argus cameras establish a lasting market for 35mm and German TLRs and improved rollfilm give "professional" quality results. (Just remembered: Dorothea Lange used a 4x5 most of the time for her WPA work. One of her coworkers--I can't remember who--had a Rollei. So I guess by the late 1930s pro photographers are using medium format for government work. Maybe that's the date for the introduction of "large format.")
    Here endeth my $.02 lesson.

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