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  1. #11
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce (Camclicker)
    Don't mean to hijack this thread, but....

    If you haven't made covenant with God to use daylight tanks, I would suggest you consider their down sides: Film hangers that are very prone to streak film even after months or years of practice; inordinate amount of chemistry needed; general bulkiness of the operation, etc.

    .
    Bruce,
    What you have said is simply not true! Not one of the problems you state are valid. They may use more chemistry than you choose to use, but for thousands of other dedicated photographers and lab tech's throughout the world, they are the standard that most other methods are determined by. If you have had bad results from daylight tanks, plastic, hard rubber or stainless the problem was you, not the tanks and hangers. That is the true and very simple facts. Anyone who has trouble, streaks or anything else with tanks and hangers in the processing of sheet film is not doing it correctly!

    Charlie.....................

  2. #12
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    Bruce,
    What you have said is simply not true! Not one of the problems you state are valid. They may use more chemistry than you choose to use, but for thousands of other dedicated photographers and lab tech's throughout the world, they are the standard that most other methods are determined by. If you have had bad results from daylight tanks, plastic, hard rubber or stainless the problem was you, not the tanks and hangers. That is the true and very simple facts. Anyone who has trouble, streaks or anything else with tanks and hangers in the processing of sheet film is not doing it correctly!

    Charlie.....................
    I can accept what you say, though I have different opinions. I may have been the cause to poor results but using rotating (Jobo CPE 2) simply eliminates problems I've come to associate with tanks.

  3. #13
    hortense's Avatar
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    As you use this tank, it will teach you its quirks. Let me share some of my experience:
    • Loading must be done very carefully mainly so you don’t load 2-sheets into one slot.
    • Agitation must NOT be done from side to side – or, a sheet may come loose.
    • Attach the film holder device carefully. Don’t ratchet down on top of the top edges of the film with too much pressure.
    • Tank drains slow so increase your dilution. This way you don’t have to be as precise in time measurement.
    If I recall correctly the capacity of the tank is 1L – not a bad size.
    I diluted the developer such that the time was approximately 12-minutes.

    Ran over 500 negs thru it not counting the USMs.
    NO more scratched emulsion.
    Bottom line, I was very pleased.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  4. #14
    JBish130's Avatar
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    I have the Combi-plan. Not sure where I got it, probably BH or Adorama. I saw them in the Freestyle catalog.

    My combi-plan works perfectly. The price seems high until you use it. I think this is one of those things where you get what you pay for.
    Jeff Bishop

    "It's light and nothing more."

  5. #15
    mitspooner's Avatar
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    WOW!! Thanks awl!! I'm stuck with daylight equipment for the next few years as the wife is in school and we live in an apartment so no real darkroom for awhile. I have bought a Crown and a Speed to get me started down the road of large format. The Combi kit sounds like my best bet to get started. I have a e-mail to send.

    Thanks again!!!

  6. #16

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    I use the Combi tank but would second the comments above about film loading. If all six slots are filled it's easy to end up with film touching. You need to check carefully *after* loading the film that they are all properly in place. You can reduce this risk by processing only four sheets at a time, but that uses more chemistry, of course, and takes more time.

    I don't have the BTZS tubes, but it has always struck me that perhaps the most convenient solution is to use the tubes for development, and the Combiplan tank for presoaking, fixing, and washing. Expensive, though.

  7. #17

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    No one has mentioned the old Nikor sheet film tank (good for cut film up to 5x4). Rumor has it they gave excellent results, and they show up on the auction site from time to time. Let's you develop 10 or so sheets at a time, just like you would 35mm or 120/220 with inversion agitation.

    I'm getting excellent results from rotary processing with my Jobo 3010 tank for 5x4. I've put thousands of sheets through it now with never any sign of uneven development. I'm using it with a Jobo CPP-2, and it's rock solid consistent.

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