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  1. #11
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    No, no, no.... you have to get it right, the trick to is get the 8x10 camera and then also get a 5x7/4x5 camera and because sometimes 8x10 is too small you might try looking for that 14x17 or 12x20...

    oh does it never end

    --To be serious, I have an 8x10 camera and a 5x7/4x5/3x4 and I plan on making a reducing back for the 8x10 which will just accept the backs from the smaller camera. As someone above said, I don't plan on using the reducing backs much in the field, but in the studio I would much rather have the 8x10 to work for the added stability and bellows, even when shoot 5x7 and smaller.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  2. #12

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    Rather than use the Brasso or other chemicals, use a jewelers cloth, takes a little more effort, but you don't have to worry about damaging your Zone VI.(always wanted one of those, enjoy!) Pat
    [SIZE=2]Shadow Catcher[/SIZE]

  3. #13
    Keith Pitman's Avatar
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    As I understand it, Zone VI began gold plating the brass hardware on their cameras after they got complaints that the lacquer finish they applied didn't hold up. People have found that the gold plating didn't hold up either. The best solution, but most complicated, would be to disassemble the camera and have the brass stripped, and then properly lacquered. I doubt if it'll be worth it to you to go to all that trouble. The suggestion to polish with a jeweler's cloth is probably the best one. Just be prepared to do it from time to time.

  4. #14
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    Hi guys, thanks for all the advice and the wishes... :-)

    I think that I won't have a problem shooting with the 420 lens on the Horseman LX-C monorail (that's why I asked if I can use the wooden lensboard on it, if I can't I'll keep the lens on a metal lensboard that will also fit the Zone VI and the Horseman). So, keeping the reducing back will not help me with shooting 4x5 with a long lens... The Linhof won't accept long lenses, of course...

    I'll try the mild solutions you gave me for cleaning the grease and the rust. I'll go easy at first, then if it doesn't work, immerse the camera in a bucket of hydrocloric acid (I'm joking).

    I'll tell you as soon as I get the first results, the only problem is that I still haven't found any film holders that I can buy from a European seller on Ebay (things coming from non EU countries get taxed by 30% :-(

    Claire, you'll finally talk me into trashing the Leica. I got a big hammer in the garage, I might use it one of these days... :-) I'll post an image of myself with the Zone VI and a Borsalino, soon.

  5. #15
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    With a GG with no plastic printed grid lines, the fastest cleaning agent by far is methylated spirit (industrial alcohol) applied with a soft duster and removed with a second dry duster. Takes about 45 seconds to clean a screen, instantly dry, no dismantling required! For plastic screens, I'd use a silicon spray, great for getting stickinesses off all kinds of plastic and guaranteed not to attack the material (unlike alcohol or lighter fuel!).

    Enjoy your "new" camera!

    Regards,

    David

  6. #16
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    The ground glass is glass (real one), and I think it's good quality (thick and well made, the grids made out of an unknown insoluble compound, maybe epoxy).

    I tried window cleaner, dish cleaner, alcohol and nothing worked. It seems that the marks are made by a varnish or something else that is not greasy and not water- or alcohol- soluble. My last resource will be Acetone, but it may dissolve the grid and the only Acetone I have in hand is the one that my spouse uses to erase her fingernails (well, the paint from her fingernails) every 12 hours and it contains an oil for lubrication (of the fingernails, I guess ? Why would anyone want to lubricate her fingernails ?).

    What I also don't understand is why this ground glass has no cut corners (to check the lens coverage). How can I ever be sure if I my lens covers the surface of the film when I make a swing or tilt or something ? (or a twist - and - shout, for the same reason) ?

  7. #17
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    If it's varnish, how about the one solvent you've apparently not tried - turpentine? If not, the only solution may be an angle grinder or a large hammer and chisel!

    Regards,

    David

  8. #18
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Papantoniou
    Hi guys, thanks for all the advice and the wishes... :-)

    I think that I won't have a problem shooting with the 420 lens on the Horseman LX-C monorail (that's why I asked if I can use the wooden lensboard on it, if I can't I'll keep the lens on a metal lensboard that will also fit the Zone VI and the Horseman). So, keeping the reducing back will not help me with shooting 4x5 with a long lens... The Linhof won't accept long lenses, of course...

    I'll try the mild solutions you gave me for cleaning the grease and the rust. I'll go easy at first, then if it doesn't work, immerse the camera in a bucket of hydrocloric acid (I'm joking).

    I'll tell you as soon as I get the first results, the only problem is that I still haven't found any film holders that I can buy from a European seller on Ebay (things coming from non EU countries get taxed by 30% :-(

    Claire, you'll finally talk me into trashing the Leica. I got a big hammer in the garage, I might use it one of these days... :-) I'll post an image of myself with the Zone VI and a Borsalino, soon.
    George- first, congrats again on the Zone VI - I have one of the latest versions with the lightweight black anodized aluminum hardware. Otherwise I think they're quite analogous.

    For the 8x10 film holders, don't be afraid of buying wood film holders from the states. Used wood film holders for 8x10 can be picked up in decent condition for as little as $10-15 USD each. Even with a 30% tax, that's still $13-19 each. Not bad. Even if you double that for the shipping, that's less than half the price of a new film holder.

  9. #19
    Ole
    Ole is offline
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    George, I have had no problems finding film holders in EU. For 8x10", ebay.co.uk, for 18x24cm ebay.de. EVen if I've bought some "the opposite way".

    So I have 8x10" film holders, and a 8x102 camera still in little pieces - and the holders don't fit my 18x24cm plate camera. But I have 18x24cm film adapters for plate cameras, and plate holders enough... I know - I have to get that 8x10" assembled!

    BTW, one of my old plate cameras has a nice variation of the "shiny brass" problem: It's all black! You can get the same if you clean the brass thoroughly, then soak the bits in Viradon
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #20
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Nice camera. I have the 4x5 version. If the 810 is anything like the 4x5, take great care with the rear standard when tilting, opening, closing, and inserting a film holder. Also make sure not to over-tighten the rear swing locks.

    My camera has a wood cross-peice that the rear standard is mounted to. This appears to be a weak spot in the design of the camera. It cracked in about 3 places and I had to dissasemble the camera and epoxy it together. I'm still worried about this peice though cause the grain goes from left to right and their is alot of pressure front to rear.

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