Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,872   Posts: 1,520,112   Online: 882
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Athens
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    985
    Images
    95

    My new Zone VI 8x10

    Just yesterday I got the package from Germany, a brand new (used :-) Zone VI 8x10...

    I was really suprised bu its bulk and weight (something like 7.5 kg with the Fuji 420mm lens) and the capabilities (swing, tilt, bellows extension)... I guess that I will have to exercise more to build my muscles and to be able to carry it around...

    Anyway, here are my questions to you LFers (and Satinsnow in particular, for the first one):

    There is a mark (see photo) on the ground glass, in resembles to a grease mark (like if someone touched the inside part of it with dirty fingers). Can it be cleaned with some detergent ? Is it dangerous to use chemicals on the inside surface of it ?

    The camera uses Sinar lensboards (this is good, for I can use all the Horseman lensboards I have). Has anyone tried to mount a Zone VI lensboard on a Sinar (or a Horseman) ? The size and thickness are the same, but the Sinar ones have a strange pattern on the inside surface that might be there for light-fastness reasons and the wooden ones I got for the Zone VI don't.

    There is some (only cosmetically disturbing) oxidation on the brass parts. Can it be removed, using something like Brasso ?

    I got a 4x5 reducing back with it, which I doubt I will ever use, for the camera is too heavy to carry around and my Linhof is much smaller and lighter. Would anyone be interested in buying it ? How much would it be worth ? Do you think it would be a good idea to sell it, or will I regret it some day ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Zone VI.jpg  

  2. #2
    John Jarosz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago area
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    148
    You may at some point in time want to use 4x5 Polaroid for exposure verification. As film gets more expensive or if you start experimenting with older uncalibrated lenses, the ability to do a test shot may get more important for you.

    John

  3. #3
    Rob Skeoch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Burlington, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    984
    On the other hand I have had a 4x5 back for my 8x10 for years and never ever use it.
    Thats whats so great about photography.... everyone has their own way of doing things.
    -Rob Skeoch
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com

  4. #4
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    George, the 4x5 reducing back for my 8x10 is a great addition to the camera. Do you have a 420mm lens for your 4x5? Also, you will have plenty of coverage with this lens and the image quality in the center of the image circle will be very good. I would keep it if I were you.

    If it is a standard ground glass, a small amount of soap on a soft cotton cloth should remove a finger mark if it is just oil or grease. Don't use a paper like tissue paper, it may leave behind some fibers on the glass. A small dab of glass cleaner applied to the cloth first should work as well. I assume this is actually glass and not some type of plastic.

    Clean a small portion of the brass in an area which doesn't show at first, but a standard metal polish like Brasso or Flitz should work. Nice camera, want to see some images when you are set up to shoot with it. Best of luck, tim

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    12
    George,

    I have both a 4x5 and 5x7 reducing back for my Wisner 8x10. I admit, I've only shot outdoors with them a few times but I use them all the time when I shoot indoors in the studio.

    A 4x5 reducing back is a very nice thing to have even if you can't think of how you would use it right now.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  6. #6
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    George - congratulations on the new "baby".

    For conventional ground glass, I like warm water and mild detergent for cleaning, applied with a soft paint brush, like one would use for painting window trim. That assumes removing the GG from the wooden frame, so as to avoid getting the wood wet. The smudge on your GG looks like oil to me, so that should work OK. If the smudge is resistant to detergent, window cleaner is OK, too, as mentioned - as long as the GG is really glass. Same caution when cleaning metal parts - keep the cleaner from touching the wood by using a plastic shield of some sort. (The same common sense sort of thing.)

    I, too, would suggest keeping the 4x5 reducing back. Not only are they good for shooting Polaroid tests, but also for shooting 4x5 film with lenses longer than would be possible on a typical 4x5 field camera.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    George I hope that you really enjoy your new camera.

    I am just thinking about how it would look if you placed a view finder on top of it and held it up to your face having the camera peek out at the would under the brim of a Borsolino. Yeah, I think that would be just the right look and a good reason for you to dump your German postage stamp sized camera.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    1,030
    George,

    I wouldn't use metal polish to clean the brass as it can migrate into the screw holes and rot the wood underneath.

    As for cleaning the ground glass, the only issue I see is if the lines have been drawn on with a pencil or not. Washing will remove the pencil lines, but the grid can be redrawn if need be.

    Enjoy that beautiful big camera!

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    1,030
    ....A good general guide to maintaining wooden cameras can be found on the Deardorff Hstorical site: http://deardorffcameras.Ocatch.com/index.html

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    1,298
    I usually just take out the ground glass and wash it off in my kitchen sink with Dawn dish soap (whichs cuts grease) and a sponge. If you need lines, you can draw them on with a ruler and fine point pencil.

    I've seen one of those Zone VI 8x10 cameras and they are a beast!

    Keep the 4x5 back, because you will find it useful. Can you use 450mm, or 600mm lenses on your 4x5 camera? Probably not...however, you can if your using the reducing back on your 8x10!

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin