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  1. #11

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    I used a larger t-nut (from Lee Valley) with the cross of the "t" at the top of the wood, so that when you tighten down it cinches the camera down on to the tripod head.

    This may be obvious, and what you intended to do. I mention it only because I saw a friend do the t-nut routine from the bottom of the camera and it ripped out the first time he used it in the field.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terence
    I used a larger t-nut (from Lee Valley) with the cross of the "t" at the top of the wood, so that when you tighten down it cinches the camera down on to the tripod head.

    This may be obvious, and what you intended to do. I mention it only because I saw a friend do the t-nut routine from the bottom of the camera and it ripped out the first time he used it in the field.
    Or course the top of the "T" would have to be on the top. You would be foolish to put it below...it just would not work that way and would defeat the whole purpose!

    Coverting the camera and tripod to 3/8" is a good idea, but more work then you think I'm sure.

    Whatever you decide you do, I suggest using epoxy to put it in. You can do a clean job and actually make it stronger then the current piece in the camera.

    I've seen people use felt on the top of their tripods, or a thin piece of rubber. I don't know about the suggestion of coating the bottom of your camera with rubber cement...thats not a good idea at all. The grip-tape idea is good...however, alot of those grip-tapes have sand in them, and it can scrap up the bottom of your nice wooden camera!

    Ryan McIntosh
    www.RyanMcIntosh.net
    Last edited by User Removed; 06-01-2006 at 04:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    I would suggest getting rid of that head and putting something that has a quick release head, such as a bogen 3030 or 3047. The 3047 might be too big for your tripod but at least get a 3030 head on there. The reason being the tripod mount is often a weak area on the camera. If you have a quick release head you can buy multiple mounts and attach one to each one of your cameras. That way you never have to take it off and your not constantly removing and reinstalling the tripod, wearing out the brass threads. Brass is also quite soft, I would highly recommend you use a hardened steel t nut or stainless. Fix it once the right way and never deal with it again. Also if you put a tripod mounting plate on your camera you can also add a locking washer and nut to the bolt (from the opposite end) and make it very rigid (as long as you have room). With a standard 3030 mounting plate just remove the stock bolt and get a longer one. I have a 3047 head with permanently mounted tripod plates on my 8x10 and 30x40cm cameras and its nice to just pop them on the tripod. Also my 30x40 is as old as the Korona and the mount would never hold up to constant threading and mounting-remounting. I hope I've given you at least some good ideas, enjoy the 8x10!

  4. #14

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    Okay, well...I would NEVER suggest someone getting a quick release tripod head for shooting anything larger than 4x5...however, the suggestion above is actually a good idea. Personally, I HATE quick release heads and think they are the worst thing ever to use with 8x10 and larger cameras, but figuring your problem, it might be a good idea.

    IF you could just permanently bolt a quick release plate on the camera, and never take it off, you would not have to worry about doing wood working or altering the camera.

    Just make sure its a REALLY good head! All quick release heads I've seen and used have got worn out over time and slowly get weaker and get abit of movement in them.

  5. #15

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    I dont have any problems with mine but it does not get hammered and beat on either. I find its alot easier to get the big camera mounted quickly on the tripod with the quick release. I do have a big 6 inch 1/4 inch thick alum plate attached to tripod mounting plate for the beast camera for stability. Basically the aluminim plate is welded to the tripod mounting plate which is also screwed into the 3/8 hole on the camera. Anyway were talking about a Korona which is not all that heavy so a quick release plate might be ideal for a fragile camera.

  6. #16
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    The hex quick release plate works great for my Kodak 2D which is simular, I have been using it for years, with no noticiable problems and no loosening on the tripod head, the 3047 is a pretty sturdy head..

    R.

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