Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,452   Posts: 1,570,300   Online: 1100
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371

    wooden tripods some questions

    Sorry folks, off course I have searched the forum but I have some questions on the wooden tripods. I have only recently been active in the Mf and Lf leaque. to my suprise I have seen many wooden tripods. Berlebachs mostly.
    The thing that stroke me was that when camera's really become bigger the tripods start getting wooden.
    I have read wood is light and dampens vibrations...
    But does that exclude metal ones? weight must be important too right?

    There must be something wrong with wood?

    like to hear. Thanks GAME {causing a stream off topics lately, sorry :I}

  2. #2
    naturephoto1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Breinigsville, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,819
    Images
    84
    Wood is not necessarily that light for the same strength. They do tend to be a bit bulkier. Most of us shooting with larger cameras tend to opt for wood or for carbon fiber due to weight and strength. Wood tends to dampen best, followed by carbon fiber which as noted is light, very strong, and quite expensive. Aluminum tripods tend to be less expensive, be strong, heavier than carbon fiber, and suffer the most from vibrations of the 3 major materials used.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Other than weight, I have never found anything wrong wtih my wood tripods.

    R.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    And do you mean the weight is too little or too much?

    Isn't weight important? I have had my bogen 144 blown away with my camera on it.

    Simply put: wood wiill dampen better. alu is heavier. What tripod will perform better: a good berlebach wooden or a good gitzo alu.

  5. #5
    tommy5c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wyoming
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    161
    Images
    10
    I personally love my Zone VI wood tripod. I they are very sturdy and a little lighter, but not by much. The biggest bonus to me at least is, people who think wood means old and crappy will sell you a great wood tripod for a song.

  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Quote Originally Posted by game
    And do you mean the weight is too little or too much?

    Isn't weight important? I have had my bogen 144 blown away with my camera on it.

    Simply put: wood wiill dampen better. alu is heavier. What tripod will perform better: a good berlebach wooden or a good gitzo alu.
    For large cameras, I enjoy my wood tripods, they are however heaver than the aluminum or carbon tripods, been shooting with a couple of for years now with out a complaint.

    R.

  7. #7
    naturephoto1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Breinigsville, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,819
    Images
    84
    There are trade offs for all the materials. As I pointed out and Roxi331 alluded, the wooden tripods are heavy for their size. You have to decide for yourself material, weight, strength, features, etc. A way to lessen the weight being carried, many tripods including the Gitzo Carbon Fiber (I have 3 and use them most of the time) is to add weight on the hook that is attached to the center column. The weight should not be allowed to swing in the wind as this will cause the simple harmonic motion of a pendulum. Rather, the weight should be resting on the ground and attached through guy wire, bungee cord, etc. to the hook. This allows the weight of lighter tripod to be used to support the camera and lens. By using this method you have effectively increased the mass of your tripod but have lessened your load.

    Other photographers using wooden tripods like the simplicity of the wooden tripods and are willing to carry the extra weight. I have a wooden Ries tripod which I also like but use far less than the carbon fiber.

    Most using the aluminum tripods are opting for a less expensive tripod that fulfills their needs. Aluminum tripods may or may not be heavier than their wooden counterparts. Carbon Fiber Gitzos are known for being approximately 28% lighter than their aluminum equivalents.

    In most instances, it is best not to leave a tripod and camera unattended to prevent the tripod from being blown over.

    As far as I know, unless there are aluminum Gitzo tripods in stock or purchased used they are no longer available. Gitzo is now or will be as far as I know only selling their Carbon Fiber and Basalt tripods.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    hmmm, so wood seems to be in favour.
    I like to put that I am unsensitive for sentiments that might stick to a wooden tripod. I like the looks but it does not mean a thing for me...

    Why are people using metal tripods??

    game

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    ok, well leaving aluminum behind us as material seems the right thing if I hear all of this posts. I just bought a foba alfae/fea and I love that one. It is so god damn sturdie and well build. But In retrospect maybe a wooden one would have been maybe just as good.

    I do not care to much about weight. I don't do extensive hiking and I am still young. I don't like a tripod that's to bulky when folded.

    How does a wooden tripod gets small? It folds? How to extend the legs?

    I might call a local shop one day to see if they have a wooden one I can test.

    Kind regards Sam

  10. #10
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,440
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by game
    hmmm, so wood seems to be in favour.
    I like to put that I am unsensitive for sentiments that might stick to a wooden tripod. I like the looks but it does not mean a thing for me...

    Why are people using metal tripods??

    game
    Cheaper, more available used, strong like ox, low maintenance. Nothing like a winter's project (the whole winter) sanding, varnishing, sanding, varnishing, how many coats? I used to varnish trim on old boats, usually seven coats. That said I have two Ries tripods that are beautiful, don't freeze to my hands, dampen vibrations and feel solid like a rock. I also have older aluminum tripods. Haven't tried a carbon yet. Cameras range in weight from 35mm to 12 pound 7x17 plus lens and film holder.

    I have the feeling that you would like one answer, but you will find there are many opinions, all of them valid for the owners. The problem can be solved many ways.

    John Powers

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin