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  1. #11

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    There is a difference. The ones for the Crown are subtantially smaller. Over on Graflex.com they have lists of the cams by number for each camera.

  2. #12

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    The cams for the top rangefinder Pacemaker series cameras and the Super Graphics are completely different and not interchangable...

    I have been trying to attach a pic of the 90mm cam for the TRF Pacemaker here and have had no luck at all...

    So, if you'd like it, send me your e-mail address and I'll send it to you directly.

    Making the cam is not all that difficult if you have the right materials and patience. The key is that two diemnsions of all cams are always the same. That's the lenght and the height at infinity. With these two dimensions from another known good cam, you can make a new one.

    With buying used cams, be careful and test them fully. Last year I bought a 210mm cam from midwest. It turned out to be a re-ground cam and about 1mm short of reaching infinity...

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichSBV
    The cams for the top rangefinder Pacemaker series cameras and the Super Graphics are completely different and not interchangable...

    I have been trying to attach a pic of the 90mm cam for the TRF Pacemaker here and have had no luck at all...

    So, if you'd like it, send me your e-mail address and I'll send it to you directly.

    Making the cam is not all that difficult if you have the right materials and patience. The key is that two diemnsions of all cams are always the same. That's the lenght and the height at infinity. With these two dimensions from another known good cam, you can make a new one.
    Rich,
    Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! I'll PM you my email addy. How'd that Super Speed work out for you?

    I've read Graflex.org on this issue some time ago and if I remember right, the suggestion was to make one and whittle away at it iteratively until it focuses correctly. Insane waste of time.

    If I have a scan of a known working cam (with a reference scale) I can easily make one that will work very, very close to the original. The key is to replicate the slope at each point along the curve.

  4. #14

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    Apr 2005
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    "WARNING: It is just possible making a cam is more difficult than it seems to be."

    DF Cardwell is right. Mechanically it's rather simple to make one's own cams, at least the rough cutting-out part of it. But to get the slope correct by filing and grinding ( and hammering the two "legs" if one has removed too much material) is time-consuming with all the intermediate testing involved.
    I made 4 cams ( for lenses from 120 - 210mm). Instead of also making one for my 90mm lens ( a cam with a tricky curve) I made my own focusing scale that's fixed next to the rails by double-tape.

  5. #15

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    Making a cam can be easy or difficult. It depends primarily on what material you use and your technique.

    I have made cams out of thin brass stock that was cut with scissors. Worked fine. Heavier stuff is filed. Worked fine. A dremel helps a lot.

    The big trick is having a known good cam. Three sides of all cams are identical! Use the old cam as a template and scribe/mark your material using that cam. Mark the two sides and bottom. These are always the same. If you put your cam into the camer and have it focused on infinity, then mark on the cam where the arm sits on the slope, you have the infinity height. This is also always the same and the starting point for the slope on the new cam. All you need from there if the rest of the slope. If you print the pic of a cam at 1:1 size of a knbown good cam, you can easily come close enough to thew new slope, especialy for a wide lens. I did a cam for a 210mm from an undimensioned pic and it works great...

    Super cams, being larger, are a bit easier to work with though...

    Chris, I e-mailed that pic in case you don't get it. If you need a dimensioned pic along side another can, I can provide that too but I've have to find my package of cams and scan it. It's around here someplace...

    This time I may have the attachment?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cam 90mm P15.JPG  

  6. #16

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    "Infinity height" for TRF Pacemaker cams is 0.437 inch or 11.1mm, according to the repair manual.
    http://www.southbristolviews.com/pic...icmanuals.html

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