Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,894   Posts: 1,520,903   Online: 973
      
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 51 to 59 of 59
  1. #51
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,156
    Images
    20
    Regarding lenses, I think you're referring to the shutter. Of course a new shutter is better than an old shutter, but there are plenty of old shutters that are quite servicable. Most of my lenses are in older shutters.

    An F has the swing/tilt calculator on the side of the rear standard. The F1 has a drum mechanism so the calculator is readable directly from the back of the camera. The F2 adds micrometer focusing on the front standard, while the earlier models only have geared focus on the rear standard, and the front standard is more robust. The differences in functionality are small, but the F2 is more expensive, since it is a current model. Parts are largely interchangeable, so it's not unusual to find Sinars with mixed and matched parts, like a camera with two F1 rear standards (one on the front).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #52
    Shmoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    972
    Images
    11
    The F2 is also heavier due to that geared front standard.

    S
    Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

  3. #53
    raucousimages's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Salt Lake
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    825
    I did not realise that prices had dropped so low on Sinars. The only problem I can see with a Sinar in the field is that they are machined to such tight tolerances dirt and sand can do a lot of damage if you get it into the gearing. This may not be a problem for you but I live in the desert and often get my cameras very dirty. Keep it clean and it will out last all of us. I keep a 45D and a couple of 45E's for bad conditions (rain-dirt) and for my kids to use but I really like my 125VX in the field. In fact the 45 AII is only used when I am backpacking more than a mile or so. And if Sinar is the Rolls Royce of 4x5's then yes I know that my Toyo 45E is the rusty Yugo but it works.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  4. #54

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,993
    Quote Originally Posted by raucousimages
    (snip) The only problem I can see with a Sinar in the field is that they are machined to such tight tolerances dirt and sand can do a lot of damage if you get it into the gearing. (snip) And if Sinar is the Rolls Royce of 4x5's then yes I know that my Toyo 45E is the rusty Yugo but it works.
    Ha... that's how I feel about using my Cambo as a field monorail. My Cambo might be heavy and not-specifically-designed-as-a-field-camera but it does what I want and will still be working after being dragged through a dust storm. Sometimes lack of tolerances is a good thing!

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,599
    Images
    116
    I use a sinar F2 extensively in the field, I fly with them as well. In use it's a great camera in the field, light yet rigid enough to use with heavy lenses. As no camera is perfect for every photographer I have made several modifications to make the camera easier to travel with and quicker to use.

    First I had SK Grimes cut the bottom inch off the twin vertical posts that rise the front and rear standards, this made the camera short enough to fit inside many more cases and it already had far more rise than I could ever use in the field anyway.

    Then I had SK cut the 6" Sinar rail, which was more like 7" with the knob that extends from it, by about an inch as well. I had Camera Bellows in the UK make me a custom bellows that extends to 23" yet compresses to about an inch, allowing me the use of all of my wide angle lenses and even a 480mm or a Nikkor 720mm tele without any change in bellows.

    Next I had the compendium bellows shade from my Canham redrilled and tapped so that I can move the mounting hole on it into a position where it aligns itself with the rod holding system on the Sinar standards. Now the compendium shade can sit on the standard all the time and given it's large size and the fact that I have all of my lenses mounted on small linhof boards and use the Sinar linhof board adapter, I can change lenses/filters with the shade on the camera. I also use the smaller non metering back on the camera as it is much smaller than the backs with the metering opening.

    Now the camera, with both standards, shade and the mounting rail ring can squash down to about 5 1/2"- 6" by 14". It fits in an F64 large format (large size) backpack as well as the lightware 14x20" size cases. All I need do in the field is mount a longer rail on it, the rail clamp is always kept attached to the tripod head (Sinar pan tilit head) and acts like a quick release.

    To speed set up in the field up even more, when I travel, including flying, I bring along a traditional box style view camera case and when in the field attach the longer rail(s) and just work it out of the case when I'm working from a vehicle. I fly with the case, filled with emptied sand bags, the reflex viewer and some other non photographic things, (including a squashed duffel bag which can hold a tripod, dirty laundry etc.), as checked baggage. If I need to hike with the camera, I just remove the long rail and put the camera in the backpack.

  6. #56

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    Thanks 4 the extensive post!
    I will check and see for myself whether the sinar will work for me or not... if not I'll definitally check out the things you mentioned.
    I think with some creative thinknig, one can come quite far with a sinar f in the field.

    4now, it's between me and my co-bidders on ebay,,,

  7. #57

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    42
    Hi Game,
    Here's a couple for you to check on: http://www.speurders.nl/fotografie/t...meras/17468353
    http://www.secondlifecameras.nl/sina..._22_24_65.html
    Or you can contact an APUG member throught the Nederlends forum. His name is Mudar and a couple of weeks ago he had an almost new Sinar F he would be willing to sell.
    Best regards,
    Phil

  8. #58

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4
    In for a penny in for a pound

    I vote for the F1 or the F2 Sinar The beake down and set up are quite simple
    all the movements are straight forward and made simple by sinar The Sinar is quite reasonable in price right now. in fact it's a steal. So I think that you couldn't go wrong.

    ron_gulsvig

  9. #59
    loman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    459
    Images
    1
    I would go for a sinar norma. They are better build, lighter and more simple than the sinar f series.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin