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  1. #1
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    I may have inadvertantly destroyed an important lens! Help sought!

    The lens is a beautiful (to me at least) Gundlach Hyperion Diffusion f4. The shutter has issues but that's not what this is about. I took the front group off to work on the shutter last week. I had set the front group on my counter next to my enlarger. OK, this is bizzarre. The float on the swamp cooler stuck and I got very saline H2O dripping through the roof in my darkroom. Being the lazy slacker that I am, I put a 16X20 tray there to catch the drip because I didn't have time to repair it. Fair enough, but the splatter was reaching the glass on the Hyperion! ARRGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH!!!

    So I have horrible water spots on the front light. I soaked it in heavy detergent water for 2 days which usually works, but it didn't touch the water spot mess. What should I do. I need to proceed very cautiously as this is a lens that has enormous potential to me.

    TIA!
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  2. #2
    DBP
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    Try soaking in Rexton Optyl-7. It has done wonders for me with some really filthy lenses.

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    Being familiar with some of that nasty desert water and the rock hard stuff we have around here, my guess is it's calcium or lime deposited on the lens. Soaps and detergents, glass cleaners, etc may not remove it. Try vinegar. Straight up. The acidity is enough to dissolve the deposit but won't hurt the glass. If that water came from the swamp cooler, the mineral content would be highly concentrated.

  4. #4

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    I second the Vinegar. Use a lens cloth to wipe it dry after using and reapply. You should see the ring get smaller and lighter with every application of vinegar. If you can let the vinegar sit on the water spot for a little while. It worked for me and our water has a wonderful texture with every bite.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  5. #5
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Jim,

    You might check with your local eyeglass lab, often times they are able to polish lens elements out with out any damage to the glass itself for a really low cost, I know I have had this done a couple of times with older lenses and was quite pleased with the results.

    R.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by glennfromwy
    Being familiar with some of that nasty desert water and the rock hard stuff we have around here, my guess is it's calcium or lime deposited on the lens. Soaps and detergents, glass cleaners, etc may not remove it. Try vinegar. Straight up. The acidity is enough to dissolve the deposit but won't hurt the glass. If that water came from the swamp cooler, the mineral content would be highly concentrated.
    Jim,

    Are there any coatings on the glass?

    I agree with Glenn. But, FWIW, I'd suggest that you use a dilute mixture to start off with. It'll give you an idea as to whether this is going to work or not.

    Good luck!

    Cheers

  7. #7
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    Jim, we have the same "water" here which comes from a swamp cooler. If it is an uncoated lens, don't soak it as it may loosen the adhesive between elements. Try some CLR (Calcium, lime, rust) from your grocery store's house hold cleaning section. Spray a little on a soft cotton cloth and see what happens. The minerals have etched the surface slightly and they will need a chemical boost to get off the glass. If it is coated, I don't know what to try. tim

  8. #8
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    The glass is indeed uncoated. Would an alkaline like TSP soften another alkaline? I'm afraid of acid as I once left a worthless lens in dilute glacial acetic acid overnight as a test and it did indeed etch the entire piece. Now I realize that dabbing some vinegar on and rinsing soon after is much different than what I experimented.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  9. #9

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    Jim,
    This may/may not work; but have you tried a water wetting agent (Photoflo) on it ?

  10. #10

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    Apply acetone with a lens cloth and then clean off the acetone with water and a dry lens cloth. If you can't get it off with acetone it will not come off. I've left coated cemented elements soaking in acetone overnite to break down the lens cement and it did not effect the coating.

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