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  1. #21
    highpeak's Avatar
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    Jim, nice work, like the F22 shot with those bottles a lot.

  2. #22
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter
    If you have a transmission without syncronizers in it, you need to puxh the clutch in to take it out of gear, release the clutch to allow the rotating shafts within the transmission to sycronize speeds, then push the clutch back in to allow you to shift one gear to another.
    Double clutching is almost optional when shifting up (from, say, 2nd to 3rd), because the input shaft will slow to match the output on its own, just from bearing friction, in a couple seconds -- but is mandatory when shifting down (from 3rd to 2nd, etc.) with a non-synchro transmission, or even with an older box with worn synchros; it's helpful in this situation even with a modern full-synchro box. This is complicated by the need to rev the engine when double clutching to a lower gear, in order to match the shaft speeds -- and failure to do this successfully used to be a prime cause of runaways in large trucks, when a driver was trying to use the engine to control speed on a downgrade, missed a shift, and then burned out the brakes without getting the thing back in gear (most heavy trucks have electrically shifted planetary boxes now, no more out-of-gear runaways).

    You know you've "arrived" in the ranks of double-clutchers when you can get a 1964 Rambler 3-on-column back into 1st gear on the fly...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #23
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    Double clutching is almost optional when shifting up (from, say, 2nd to 3rd), because the input shaft will slow to match the output on its own, just from bearing friction, in a couple seconds -- but is mandatory when shifting down (from 3rd to 2nd, etc.) with a non-synchro transmission, or even with an older box with worn synchros; it's helpful in this situation even with a modern full-synchro box. This is complicated by the need to rev the engine when double clutching to a lower gear, in order to match the shaft speeds -- and failure to do this successfully used to be a prime cause of runaways in large trucks, when a driver was trying to use the engine to control speed on a downgrade, missed a shift, and then burned out the brakes without getting the thing back in gear (most heavy trucks have electrically shifted planetary boxes now, no more out-of-gear runaways).

    You know you've "arrived" in the ranks of double-clutchers when you can get a 1964 Rambler 3-on-column back into 1st gear on the fly...
    The '39 has the Model A Truck 4 speed ('29-'42). Straight cut gears all. It is happiest with double clutch up and downshift. Too much revolving weight to wait around for friction.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

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