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  1. #11
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    What kind of work do you want to do with it ?

    Waiting is always a good option. Movements are seldom used correctly, let alone, creatively for quite some time. LF is all too often about playing with the toys.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    LF is all too often about playing with the toys.
    And what is wrong with that!

  3. #13

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    Dear Anupam,

    Seriously consider a Kodak Specialist half plate/5x7. Heavy, yes, but folds up reasonably small AND gives a decent sized neg instead of that miserable little 5x4.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  4. #14
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replys. I will take a long hard look at these cameras and decide. Maybe I'll decide to wait - I don't know, but I am sure these suggestions will help.

    Quote Originally Posted by bart Nadeau
    If you are interested in macro work, recalling your suggestion to set up a macro section, I would think you would want the longer bellows - or do you intend to use the 45 for marco?
    bart
    Not initially, anyways - I can't imagine tracking a damselfly with that rig , but who can tell!

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera
    Without knowing your budget, I'd suggest looking at a Shen-Hao as a really nice field camera with movements
    As I said in my post, $200 for now - but I'll look up the Shen Hao anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    What kind of work do you want to do with it ?

    Waiting is always a good option. Movements are seldom used correctly, let alone, creatively for quite some time. LF is all too often about playing with the toys.
    Initially landscape and some architecture. But I do want to use it to learn the possibilities. Playing would be part of it, of course, but hopefully I will also learn to make good use of it. I find myself not using MF that much because it doesn't seem to add too much to meticulously shot and processed 35mm. I am expecting LF to be different in more ways than just film size.

    Thanks,
    Anupam

  5. #15
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Good to hear you're not thinking of chasing a damselfly with 4x5 - all the advantages of LF vanish when you start getting really close. 4x5 seems to be happy to shoot rocks, less so with living things.

    Over the next couple years, why not borrow a camera from time to time, and play with it ? See what you're happy with. Movements are used sparingly by a lot of LF nature shooters. The school of precise, contrived, and boring 'outdoor shooting' ( sorry guys ) needs lots of movements. See where you land.

    A Crown is one of the great cameras of all time. You may find that you only need a big negative.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I often use press cameras for convenience. Mine have been modified to provide more versatility. It doesn't take a lot of mechanical skills to do this, although butchering a good camera might bother some photographers. Some Busch press cameras have a revolving back, which is an improvement over the Speed Graphic line. The older Busch and Speed Graphic lines use 4" lens boards which are easy to fabricate. The same boards fit on my view cameras. If you shop patiently and buy carefully from online auctions, you can get most of your money back by reselling when you want to upgrade.

  7. #17
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    He who dies with the most toys wins!
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  8. #18
    MattCarey's Avatar
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    The Burke and James Orbit or the Calumet 400-series monorails can be had very cheaply. Mine was a gift, but I was told it was about $60. I remember Jim Galli selling a Calumet for <$100.

    My Burke and James press camera was about $175, as I recall. It came with a Kodak 152mm ektar (worth about $150) and a polaroid back (worth about $25), making the camera basically free.

    The B&J has a rotating back and a fair amount of front movements.

    Matt

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by raucousimages
    He who dies with the most toys wins!
    If I have to die to win, I won' play the game.

  10. #20
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Good to hear you're not thinking of chasing a damselfly with 4x5 - all the advantages of LF vanish when you start getting really close. 4x5 seems to be happy to shoot rocks, less so with living things. . . .
    I like the versatlity of LF for macro photography. Enlarger lenses or lenses from 35mm cameras reverse mounted on a 4x5 are a quick way to get 4X magnification on big film. A framing guide and electronic flash help in capturing moving subjects. Where DOF doesn't matter, reverse mounting movie camera lenses really boosts magnification.

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