Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,748   Posts: 1,515,703   Online: 913
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35
  1. #21

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    229
    Images
    22
    Why not just get a tilt/shift lens for your 35mm? Or,Zorki makes cool adapters for MF. You would save a shitload of money/time/film/frustration.


    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu
    Thanks for all the replys. I will take a long hard look at these cameras and decide. Maybe I'll decide to wait - I don't know, but I am sure these suggestions will help.



    Not initially, anyways - I can't imagine tracking a damselfly with that rig , but who can tell!



    As I said in my post, $200 for now - but I'll look up the Shen Hao anyway.



    Initially landscape and some architecture. But I do want to use it to learn the possibilities. Playing would be part of it, of course, but hopefully I will also learn to make good use of it. I find myself not using MF that much because it doesn't seem to add too much to meticulously shot and processed 35mm. I am expecting LF to be different in more ways than just film size.

    Thanks,
    Anupam

  2. #22

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    229
    Images
    22
    Take my advice with the proverbial grain of salt however, coming as it is from someone with a 25 LF cameras and at last count 375 LF lenses.

    IT

  3. #23
    smieglitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,863
    Images
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by ineffablething
    Take my advice with the proverbial grain of salt however, coming as it is from someone with a 25 LF cameras and at last count 375 LF lenses.

    IT
    And just out of curiosity, which combination is your favorite?

    Joe

  4. #24

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    229
    Images
    22
    It really just depends. Most of the lenses were bought in bulk. One time, I bought a set of 8 brass lenses from a gentleman in England. We conversed a bit about lenses and life, and he ended up throwing in his entire lens collection (around 60 ,IIRC). Every time I open a box in my back room, I come across another dozen or so I'd forgotten. In LF, mostly I shoot with my 8x10 Masterview, and in the smaller formats I shoot almost entirely Graflex SLRs. Lenswise, I only have two modern lenses, a 250 f6.7 Fujinon, and a 360mm Nikkor-W. Everything else is brass. Each is unique and useful for certain situations or people.

    W.







    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz
    And just out of curiosity, which combination is your favorite?

    Joe

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,516
    Images
    77
    For the original questioner, I have a 4x5 Speed, the lack of movements don't affect me very much, but when I need movements, the B&J Watson 5x7 comes out. I have a 4x5 back for it also but that's irrelevent to this conversation. B&J also made a wooden 4x5 version of the Watson. It's not too heavy, the movements are a bit clunky but overall for a hundred bucks or less, a fine camera.

    Remember, movements mean time. It takes a while to set everything up. It's why they call it a "Speed" Graphic. Drop the front, pull out the standard, pop open the rear window focus and shoot. The Watson takes longer, you need to zero things, then focus, then adjust, then focus, then stop down, look at DOF, then focus, adjust... etc... etc... Same as any fully functional LF camera. Some just have easier controls.

    Anyhow, good luck in your search.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #26
    smieglitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,863
    Images
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by ineffablething
    ... We conversed a bit about lenses and life, and he ended up throwing in his entire lens collection...
    Now that we've conversed a bit, any chance you'll follow his lead should I win another of your ebay auctions?

    Joe

  7. #27
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,802
    Blog Entries
    1
    It was called a "Speed Graphic" because of the 1/1000 second focal plane shutter, not because it was quick to open. Those of us who used them before the "Crown Graphic" was introduced, and even after, rarely closed them so rapid set-up was not a problem.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,290
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones
    I like the versatlity of LF for macro photography. Enlarger lenses or lenses from 35mm cameras reverse mounted on a 4x5 are a quick way to get 4X magnification on big film. A framing guide and electronic flash help in capturing moving subjects. Where DOF doesn't matter, reverse mounting movie camera lenses really boosts magnification.
    Interesting advice, Jim.

    Do you use a focusing frame? I ask not to be obnoxious but because I've wondered abouts problems setting them up. Fascinating tools, touted highly for use with very simple little 35 mm cameras plus a diopter in Kodak Publication N-12 (I think that's the number) Closeup Photography.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  9. #29
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,770
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    Interesting advice, Jim.

    Do you use a focusing frame? I ask not to be obnoxious but because I've wondered abouts problems setting them up. Fascinating tools, touted highly for use with very simple little 35 mm cameras plus a diopter in Kodak Publication N-12 (I think that's the number) Closeup Photography.

    Cheers,

    Dan
    Here a focusing frame is improvised from a spare front standard from a Century Graphic and mounted on the rail of a somewhat modified 4x5 Anniversary model Speed Graphic. This outfit accomodates a wide variety of lenses and magnification ratios. Here it is set up to shoot a full frame image of a penny with the reverse mounted Super-Angulon f/3.4 21mm from my Leica M4. For shooting mobile subjects the white foam core could be removed and any framing device substituted. According to information (which I can't locate at the moment) by Lennart Nilsson, the wider the coverage of the lens, the greater the possible depth of field. Some of his macro- and micro-photographs have spectacular DOF. If my calculations are correct, some of this depth is lost when using retrofocus wide angle lenses, although much lens-to-subject clearance is gained. Enlarger lenses are an inexpensive source of quality micro lenses when reverse mounted. Some have rather large minimum apertures, though.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails SpeedG05.jpg  

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,290
    Jim, thanks very much for the reply. I'm more puzzled now than I was before.

    As I look at the picture of your rig, I see a speciman holder, not a device that indicates where the plane of best focus is and that shows the area the film will see.

    When I think of a focusing frame, I see two rather different devices.

    One is a copy stand for a screw mount Leica. These stands have four legs. When the stand is placed on the subject, usually a document to be copied, the legs' feet define the rectangle that the film will see. And when the camera, with the right lens and diopter mounted, is laid in the copy stand the subject will be in good focus.

    The other is a rectangular wire frame somehow held in front of, e.g., an Instamatic with a diopter lens attached. The frame is in the plane of best focus, makes it and the area the film will see visible. In practice, one holds the camera so that the frame surrounds the subject, e.g., a flower and pushes the button.

    I'm sorry to be so obtuse. What am I missing?

    Thanks again, regards,

    Dan

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin