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  1. #11

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    Far VERY temporary fix, I have used Glad Press'n Seal plastic wrap. Work surprisingly well and it will stick film rails in a 35mm, Polaroid film packs, backs, etc.
    JeffW.

  2. #12
    Gatsby1923's Avatar
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    Well the rain has given me a reprieve until at least tomorrow. I saw a lot of ideas I never would have thought of. I am going to try a few of them and report back.

    Dave M.
    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.
    Carl Sandburg

  3. #13
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    Oh great Roger. I used up all the valve grinding compound on glass and now the flathead has started missing. Sounds like an exhaust valve.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  4. #14

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    The easiest for me when I fell on my ass with my rig in tow was what Tim and Jim suggested. I bought the glass at the local project center for a few dollars and contacted a local guy that does industrial lapping, He couldn't see charging me for the carborundum so he gave me a bag of 400 and 600, I returned with a print for his office.

    There's a thread some where around here on how to grind the glass, it's very simple.

    Mike

  5. #15
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Grinding glass is actually pretty simple, the different qualities of glass will depend on the medium you use, I found carborundum to be pretty course, hence the reason I worked with different compounds to come up with a high quality grinding compound comprised of several different materials, but again, making ground glass is pretty simple, heck anyone with access to a sand blaster can make a ground glass in about 30 seconds..albeit a low quality one with poor light transmission properties.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow Ground Glass

  6. #16

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    The following from my trusty 1943 edition of the Photo-Lab Index:

    Ground Glass Substitute
    Water 200 cc
    Rice Startch 20 grams
    Water glass (sodium silicate solution, sp.gr. q. 1.3) 100 cc.

    Mix the above by first rubbing the starch up with water, then add the water glass solution. Level a sheet of glass and pour enough of the above solution on to cover it and permit it to dry.

    The coating is fragile and affected by water; it should be protected by lacquering with any good cellulose lacquer.


    Etching Solution
    For Frosting Glass

    Sodium or potassium fluoride 4 grams
    Gelatin 4 grams
    Warm water to make 1 liter

    Warm the solution (not over 125F or 52C) and stir until gelatin is dissolved. Coat the resulting solution on glass and permit to dry thoroughly.

    Immerse the dry coated glass in 6% hydrochloric acid solution (made by diluting 6 parts of concentrated (36%) hydrochloric acid with 30 parts of water) for 30 to 60 seconds, and permit to dry without washing. After the glass is dry, the gelatin may be removed with hot water, leaving a fine etched surface.

    (Note that in the last formula, fluorides are poisenous and dangerous; concentrated hydrochloric acid is dangerous. If you try this, wear gloves and do it in a well ventilated area.)

  7. #17
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    The following from my trusty 1943 edition of the Photo-Lab Index:

    Ground Glass Substitute
    Water 200 cc
    Rice Startch 20 grams
    Water glass (sodium silicate solution, sp.gr. q. 1.3) 100 cc.

    Mix the above by first rubbing the starch up with water, then add the water glass solution. Level a sheet of glass and pour enough of the above solution on to cover it and permit it to dry.

    The coating is fragile and affected by water; it should be protected by lacquering with any good cellulose lacquer.


    Etching Solution
    For Frosting Glass

    Sodium or potassium fluoride 4 grams
    Gelatin 4 grams
    Warm water to make 1 liter

    Warm the solution (not over 125F or 52C) and stir until gelatin is dissolved. Coat the resulting solution on glass and permit to dry thoroughly.

    Immerse the dry coated glass in 6% hydrochloric acid solution (made by diluting 6 parts of concentrated (36%) hydrochloric acid with 30 parts of water) for 30 to 60 seconds, and permit to dry without washing. After the glass is dry, the gelatin may be removed with hot water, leaving a fine etched surface.

    (Note that in the last formula, fluorides are poisenous and dangerous; concentrated hydrochloric acid is dangerous. If you try this, wear gloves and do it in a well ventilated area.)

    Yup,

    And following these instructions, you will end up with a 1943 quality ground glass, which over the years we have found is lacking when it comes to resolving power...this guy was after a quick fix for a situation that had occured..The course nature of these two methods may not derive the solutions and fine grain that most photographers demand these days, as time has moved on, so has solutions.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow Ground Glass

  8. #18
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    Lesson #1 Protect your ground glass.
    Lesson #2 Keep a spare in each size you shoot.
    knowing how to make do in an emergency is a great bit of knowledge.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike A
    The easiest for me when I fell on my ass with my rig in tow was what Tim and Jim suggested. I bought the glass at the local project center for a few dollars and contacted a local guy that does industrial lapping, He couldn't see charging me for the carborundum so he gave me a bag of 400 and 600, I returned with a print for his office.

    There's a thread some where around here on how to grind the glass, it's very simple.

    Mike
    I forgot to mention that I the other easy thing I did was ordered one of Daves beautifully ground peices for my primary viewing screen.

    Mike

  10. #20
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    I always wondered about coating a piece of glass with parafin. Just a thin coat. Is not a Boss screen made with wax between layers of glass? May not work in the desert on a hot day.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

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