Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,545   Posts: 1,544,499   Online: 1141
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    Gatsby1923's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Holyoke, MA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    243
    Images
    63

    Emergency Ground Glass

    OK my ground glass was accidentally destroyed tonight and I need to shoot some 8x10 tomorrow. I will probably order a new one from Satin Snow glass. Until then I think I will just make one myself from some old 8x10 picture frame glass. I have two options easily available. First, being a can of the spray on glass frosting paint you can get at Home Depot. Seems easy enough to do and I have seen it used on small arts and crafts projects with successes. Option #2 is get some acid for etching glass. I can get this at my local craft store. I have a feeling that is a lot harder to do than spray painting glass… So if any one hear had to made a ground glass in a pinch what would you do?

    Dave M.
    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.
    Carl Sandburg

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Dave,

    Here is what I would do!, Get a roll of scotch 3/4 inch tape, the opaque type and get yourself a piece of glass that will fit your camera, lay the tape edge to edge and you will have a usable piece of glass to shoot with...the craft store acid is very difficult to get even and the spray is very difficult to apply without dirt in the spray, the tape has saved my ass more than once..

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow Ground Glass

  3. #3
    Robert Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,040
    Images
    28
    Ah, so now we know how Dave makes his glass!
    Robert Hall
    www.RobertHall.com
    www.RobertHall.com/mobile
    Apug Portfolio
    Facebook Profile


    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  4. #4
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Yeah, but somehow he gets those seams so dang close together....

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    193
    You can also use a cheap plexiglas picture frame. Cut it to the right size, and go at it with 400 grit sandpaper. Richard Ritter shows how in his DVD, and it works.

    He starts by showing how he uses an oversize piece of plexi with Velcro buttons as a GG protector. It can, in an emergency, be scored and broken off to fit as a GG, and then abraded with the sandpaper that you carry with you. Voila! Camera Repair in the Field. The protector part is a little late for you right now, but perhaps a suggestion for the future (unless you broke it by dropping it, like me!).

    Good luck!

    Bruce Barlow

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Yet another option (which I have used) is two sheets of glass and some valve grinding paste -- though I imagine very few people have valve grinding paste (for car cylinder heads) handy nowadays. Even so, it must be easier to get and safer to use than hydrofluoric acid.

    Something i may try later today (because I'm curious and I've just thought of it) is a sheet of drughtsman's tracing acetate (like the old Kodatrace) secured to the glass with spray adhesive or simply taped at the edges or even stretched tight and held by the GG frame.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  7. #7
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    The picture frame glass idea works well. To do the surface, tape one side with a heavy tape to avoid scratches. Use some lapidary carborundum (400 or 600) to work the other side with a smaller peice of glass and water, small circular motions. It works, but takes a bit of elbow grease. tim

  8. #8
    cdholden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    727
    I've got a spare SS gg I'd be willing to get rid of. Send me a pm if interested.
    Chris

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,597
    Images
    122
    I have mentioned this in other threads before but the 'ground glass' in my camera is a piece of fine textured polycarbonate (General Electric fine textured Lexan) fixed to perspex (plexiglass) with optically clear adhesive.
    This material is usually used by screen printing companies to produce labels, nameplates and membrane switch graphic layers. If you have a sign making screen printing company or a membrane switch manufacturer in your area they should be able to supply you with a piece. A bit to fit a camera would generally be considered an off cut and would probably end up in the bin.
    This material is very similar to the draughting film suggested by Roger but is usually a bit thicker.

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #10
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,846
    Blog Entries
    1
    I use 600 grit carborundum and two pieces of glass of the size needed.

    I end up with two new ground glass using the same effort as for one. Also by using two pieces the same siz I believe I monimize the chance of having part of the glass ground more or less than the rest.
    Jim
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin