Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,851   Posts: 1,582,866   Online: 878
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    504
    Images
    20

    Lensboard DIY and wide angle lens use - a couple of Bender 4x5 questions

    I am almost set with my new Bender 4x5 but have a couple of questions before I can go out and shoot.

    [1] I need to mount my lens which is in a copal 1 shutter onto the lensboard and am wondering if this could be a DIY project for someone who has never done any woodwork or should I go to a local camera repair company to get it done. I ask because the bender lensboard seems to be essentially a piece of 4x4 acrylic/wood and it seems feasible that even a woodworking beginner could use a $25 drill to make a 1 5/8" hole in it for the Copal 1 shutter. I have read that one needs to go slow to prevent the acrylic from melting but assume that with a little care it can be done.

    Secondly, I could just buy cheap plywood and make experimental lenboards for my enlarger lenses etc which I probably would not if I had to fork out for each lens hole. The drill would also probably come in handy for other quirks like drilling through 35mm body caps to install pinholes etc.

    So all in all, it looks like a swell plan - but I want to be aware of any potential pitfalls that might pop up.

    [2] As far as I can tell the minimum distance between the standards on a bender is about 135mm. That kind of spoils my plans for a wide angle because even if I were to get a bag bellows, the standards wouldn't get any closer. One solution might be to put the bit that attaches to the tripod not in between but to one side of the standards but I would like to hear opinions as to whether this is a good idea and how it affects stability.

    Thanks,
    Anupam

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    1) No idea about acrylic but with wood it's fairly simple. OTOH big bits and hand drills aren't the best combination.



    2) That's pretty standard method. No worries.

  3. #3
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    504
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    2) That's pretty standard method. No worries.
    Do you keep the tripod attachment to the side for other lenses too? Otherwise just switching to a wideangle for one shot would be a nightmare in the field. What is the maximum extension with the bag bellows - I am wondering if it can handle a 90mm as well as a 150mm or so for non close up shots.

    -A

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,305
    Anupam,
    It's a pretty simple job. The only problem may be using hole saws since you'll need one for each different size hole you want. Usually you can get inexpensive ones at Harbor Freight Tools for 2-4 bucks apiece. You only need one arbor & an assortment of saws of appropriate size.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu
    Do you keep the tripod attachment to the side for other lenses too? Otherwise just switching to a wideangle for one shot would be a nightmare in the field. What is the maximum extension with the bag bellows - I am wondering if it can handle a 90mm as well as a 150mm or so for non close up shots.

    -A

    No you'd only use it for wide angle lenses. No idea with the bender but it's a normal method with other monorails.

    How hard depends on the design of the tripod mount. Many are pretty quick to change over.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Burlington, VT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    69
    Images
    5

    recessed lens board

    Anupam,

    You can easily drill out the lensboards yourself.

    The trick I used to mount the 90mm Angulon on my Bender was to put the lensboard on the back of the front standard so it is sandwiched between the back of the front standard and the front of the bellows frame. I should add that I use two countersunk screws (top and bottom) that go through the lensboard 'ridge' in the front standard and into the front bellows frame instead of the 'L' screws provided in the kit. It is a simple matter to drill two matching holes in the lensboard. This works well but I got a short very flexible cable release (from Gepe it think) so I can use a regular cable release.

    Scott

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Binghamton, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    264
    Bender himself recommends just adding two extension pieces to the front of your front standard. I used that method, + moving the middle piece to use a 75mm on the Bender (w/ bag-bellows).

  8. #8
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    504
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by fparnold
    Bender himself recommends just adding two extension pieces to the front of your front standard. I used that method, + moving the middle piece to use a 75mm on the Bender (w/ bag-bellows).
    Could you explain a little more what you mean by this - especially "adding two extension pieces to the front of your front standard." Or maybe an illustration would help (I don't have the manual).

    -Anupam

  9. #9
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,859
    Hardboard, such as Masonite, might be less elegant than plywood, but is readily available and easy to work with. If the Bender uses a board 1/4 thick with a 1/8 rabbet around the rear edge, it can be fabricated of two squares of 1/8 inch hardboard glued together. Even foam core from a hobby shop or Walmart will do for temporary use. Any lens board, especially foam core, should be painted black at least on the back side to prevent light transmission or light leaks. Some spray paint may dissolve some foam core.

    My cheap set of hole saws like John K. describes has 1 1/2 and 1 3/4 blades, but no 1 5/8. The smaller hole could be rasped or whittled out to fit the shutter. A fly cutter is adjustable to any size, but is best used in a drill press.

    Some shutters don't readily mount in a board as thick as 1/4 inch. In this case, a large cleareance hole can be cut in the back layer of the board before it is glued to the front.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Burlington, VT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    69
    Images
    5
    Anupam,

    I'll give a shot at describing what Jay Bender does to use a wide angle lens with the bag bellows. Two pieces of wood with Tee-nuts are glued on the front lens standard right in front of the regular Tee-nuts. When the new Tee-nuts are used this shifts the front standard back closer to the rear standard. When a bag bellows is used this allows the front standard to be moved closer to the ground glass since you don't have the thickness of the compressed normal bellows in the way. I haven't used this set up but the front standard is smaller than the rear and maybe it will actually fit inside the rear a bit.

    The method I described previously works well with the 90mm Angulon but the normal bellows are completely compressed and doesn't allow for any movements which is ok for me since the Angulon doesn't allow any movements. In fact it is all ok because I use a Crown Graphic now for the most part. I really like the Bender but the Crown is almost a point and shoot in comparison

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin