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  1. #21
    roteague's Avatar
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    How difficult would it be to travel around that part of the world if you don't speak Spanish?
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    How difficult would it be to travel around that part of the world if you don't speak Spanish?
    In Buenos Aires, not too big a deal. Lots of people there speak english. Same with most tourist destinations. However, get a little off the beaten track, and you would definitely come up short without some knowledge of the language. You might have difficulty even in Buenos Aires with the occasional cab driver, or someone working somewhere that is not in a tourism related industry, like a drugstore or some of the cyber cafes.

    The Cybercafes are almost omnipresent. It seems like this is the way most people down in Argentina (and perhaps much of Latin America) get access to the internet. They are quite cheap, but it will be hit or miss as to the services they offer and the level of support they can give. Most places have file attaching blocked, so I have been unable to post any photos so far. Some places have very strict parental controls in place. I have a subscription to Match.com, and I got an email from them. When I tried to read it, the parental control system kicked in and informed me that it was blocked and I could not read it at that terminal. Match.com is hardly pornography, so I was suprised they had it locked down that tight.

  3. #23
    roteague's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot, I'm looking forward to hearing more about your trip when you get back. Sorry, to hear that you are having such problems connecting.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #24
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    The problem is not finding a place to get online, it´s just a question of what services which cafes offer. Lots of cybercafes have the CD drive completely disabled. Some have parental controls in place. Nobody has blocked APUG, however It`s just a hit-or-miss thing you`ll find with getting online down here. Also, another thing, I have found very few places where the keyboards are consistent. Some have the @ sign on the keyboard as an alt-q, others it is alt gr - 2 (alt gr is a key that is not on english keyboards). Sometimes they even have US English keyboards, but that have been reprogrammed for the Spanish keyset. My pinkie is getting carpal tunnel from trying to re-learn the location for the dash/underscore.

  5. #25

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    Ahh, lucky you. I spent a month in BsAs earlier this year (it was winter down there, and the friend I stayed with is too lazy to heat his apartment, so it was like urban camping). Great city. It was a huge hassle finding anything specific when I wanted it though; seems the city is divided into districts where shops that sell only very specific types of merchandise can be found. The only things I could ever find when I needed them were taxis, locutorios, and kioskos. Good luck if you need to buy an umbrella but happen to be in the vacuum cleaner district, or the light fixture district I guess knowing more than my basic tourist spanish would have helped here.

    If you're still there, try to get out of the city for a few days. I'd recommend at the very least the ferry ride across the river to Colonia del Sacramento in Uruguay. (see buquebus website, http://www.buquebus.com ). You can make a day trip of it, and I recommend taking the fast ferry out (1 hr trip) and the slow ferry back (3 hour trip), because this lets you stay in Uruguay the longest (the slow ferry back leaves later than the fast one). Border formalities are nothing to worry about, and the town is beautiful. Going north to Iguazu national park is also a very good idea.

    BTW, you can get nice views and photos of the bsas skyline if you head to the ecological park (in costanera sur? something like that - at the far right of the map if you have a pocket Guia-T to refer to). Lots of tall grasses and lagoons to decorate the foreground with.

    I got kind of weary of the place after a full month of being on vacation there, but man I sure miss it now. Oh to taste a revolting lukewarm pancho again, or eat a massive slab of tenderloin with an expensive bottle of wine for like $20.
    Last edited by walter23; 09-20-2006 at 01:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
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    Home now...

    I'm back home now. It was a wonderful trip. I didn't have the same problems you did with finding things, but A, I wasn't there as long, and B, I do have a pretty good grasp of the language (it was my academic double-major in college... ahh, to be able to write/speak the way I did then... perfect grammar and pronunciation...). I did make it over to Colonia for the day. I took the slow ferry over and back. Colonia is very pretty, and it makes for a great break from the air pollution in BsAs. I've got to start processing my b/w negs from the trip. I got all my 35mm color stuff done over there, and was mostly satisfied with the processing, which was quite inexpensive. However, the lab dorked up one roll of my film, and then tried to blame it on my camera (small problem - the roll in question was not the last roll I shot, and nothing I shot before or after experienced the same issue). I would have pressed them on the issue, but it was my very last day, and the last hours of that day for that matter, and the best I could have hoped for was for them to refund the processing on that roll anyway.

    Another tip for travelling with Large Format - bring along some extra black plastic film bags to double-bag your film. This will prevent or at least delay long enough any over-zealous and under-intelligent inspectors from getting to your exposed but undeveloped sheet film. I had some numb-brain security inspector for United start opening my box where I had downloaded all my exposed film. Fortunately I was able to stop her in time, but I had taken a separate bag from my Ilford 8x10 film and put the 5x7 bag inside it, so I was doubly shielded. If you are planning to travel with anything bigger than 5x7, I would recommend including an extra day or maybe two in your trip for processing your film in the field- It just gives you an extra layer of safety to prevent your film from being wrecked by someone else's stupidity. Pack dry chemistry, in original manufacturer packaging, and buy distilled water to mix when you arrive. If you want to hit the road with anything bigger than 8x10, good luck and god bless, but then you already know what you're getting into having used it at home.

    If I didn't say this before, get used to having to take out the camera for each and every customs/security/immigration inspector you encounter. 90%+ of this will be out of pure curiosity on their part. Most can't believe the camera still works, and they'll take a few seconds to wrap their heads around the lenses on lensboards bit too.

  7. #27
    roteague's Avatar
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    Welcome back Scott. Great to hear about your trip, and glad it was so successful. I'm really looking forward to seeing your images.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #28
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    I've enjoyed this little travelogue. Very good.

    (800), #:>)
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  9. #29

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    good work. i just completed my first (domestic) travel with my 4x5 and 8x10. my responses to the "are you a pro?" was of course not, the pros all use digital! works well. i also had the luxury of shipping my film home. i did not want to deal with the TSA guys (although i had a very very possiive experience hand checking all my film on the way out. no problems what so ever) with my exposed film. my film arrived home before i did.

    eddie


    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I'm back home now. It was a wonderful trip. I didn't have the same problems you did with finding things, but A, I wasn't there as long, and B, I do have a pretty good grasp of the language (it was my academic double-major in college... ahh, to be able to write/speak the way I did then... perfect grammar and pronunciation...). I did make it over to Colonia for the day. I took the slow ferry over and back. Colonia is very pretty, and it makes for a great break from the air pollution in BsAs. I've got to start processing my b/w negs from the trip. I got all my 35mm color stuff done over there, and was mostly satisfied with the processing, which was quite inexpensive. However, the lab dorked up one roll of my film, and then tried to blame it on my camera (small problem - the roll in question was not the last roll I shot, and nothing I shot before or after experienced the same issue). I would have pressed them on the issue, but it was my very last day, and the last hours of that day for that matter, and the best I could have hoped for was for them to refund the processing on that roll anyway.

    Another tip for travelling with Large Format - bring along some extra black plastic film bags to double-bag your film. This will prevent or at least delay long enough any over-zealous and under-intelligent inspectors from getting to your exposed but undeveloped sheet film. I had some numb-brain security inspector for United start opening my box where I had downloaded all my exposed film. Fortunately I was able to stop her in time, but I had taken a separate bag from my Ilford 8x10 film and put the 5x7 bag inside it, so I was doubly shielded. If you are planning to travel with anything bigger than 5x7, I would recommend including an extra day or maybe two in your trip for processing your film in the field- It just gives you an extra layer of safety to prevent your film from being wrecked by someone else's stupidity. Pack dry chemistry, in original manufacturer packaging, and buy distilled water to mix when you arrive. If you want to hit the road with anything bigger than 8x10, good luck and god bless, but then you already know what you're getting into having used it at home.

    If I didn't say this before, get used to having to take out the camera for each and every customs/security/immigration inspector you encounter. 90%+ of this will be out of pure curiosity on their part. Most can't believe the camera still works, and they'll take a few seconds to wrap their heads around the lenses on lensboards bit too.

  10. #30
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie gunks View Post
    good work. i just completed my first (domestic) travel with my 4x5 and 8x10. my responses to the "are you a pro?" was of course not, the pros all use digital! works well. i also had the luxury of shipping my film home. i did not want to deal with the TSA guys (although i had a very very possiive experience hand checking all my film on the way out. no problems what so ever) with my exposed film. my film arrived home before i did.

    eddie
    I seriously considered shipping my film home, but when I priced just shipping it TO Argentina instead of carrying it on, it was something like $250 via FedEx. Domestically, the price differential might well be worth it.

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