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  1. #11
    Ole
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    walter, to a certain extent you can do that. But the shape of things will also be distorted, and it usually takes a lot of movement to get any usable change in size ratio.

    I happen to have a camera where 90mm is nowhere near limiting on movements - two cameras, incidentally, and very different. Made about a century apart. No, I wouldn't recommend either of them to anyone just starting out, they're a bit too different.

    I have found myself using wider and wider lenses the larger the format, much of the time I use 150mm lenses from 35mm via MF to 24x30cm (9.5x12"). If I want a wider view I use a bigger camera...

    For 4x5", my most used lenses are 90, 150, 240 and 355mm. With the occasional 121, 135, 165, 180, 210 or 300mm thrown in.

    I suggest you start with an elderly 150mm with plenty of coverage - the 150mm f:5.6 Symmar is a good one. Quite sharp enough, plenty of coverage for that kind of focal plane games, and (comparatively) cheap. Although I admit that last time I did something like that, I used a 165mm f:6.8 Angulon for even more coverage. And the bellows was almost twisted to a pretzel. Maybe I shouldn't have told you that...

    Another low-cost camera worth looking at is the new Hungarian Argentum. I know next to nothing about them, but they seem to be very well designed.
    Last edited by Ole; 09-20-2006 at 09:48 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Spelling mistake in the URL.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Another low-cost camera worth looking at is the new Hungarian Argentum. I know next to nothing about them, but they seem to be very well designed.

    They've got an 8x10 for 610 Euros and it's only 2kgs???

  3. #13
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    They've got an 8x10 for 610 Euros and it's only 2kgs???
    Yet another one who spotted the obvious attraction !

    Yes, it seems correct. And they can even cut cost and weight on that, by making it horizontal or vertical format only!

    Communication with them have been great so far: I'm looking into a 8x10" camera specially adapted to wide-angle use - 120mm to 240mm covers just about 99% of everything I shoot in that size. Something like a vertical xl, size XL...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    Thanks Juan and Gordon. Gordon, is it a big hassle to remove the ground glass and insert the polaroid holder, or is this something you can do fairly easily without disrupting your composition / focus?

    Juan, as far as adapting to the movements I have goes, I guess that's a good point, but if I don't have the movements to play with I might as well stick with small format because the image quality is good enough for me - I don't need the huge negatives. I want camera movements, and I can think of a lot of cases in my real world photography where they would have been very useful. But it does sound like the shenhao probably has enough for me.
    A polaroid holder works quite easily with either camera. You dont have to remove anything, it slides in just like a film holder. The Tach is lighter, more compact when folded and is a little bit better camera for backpacking and such. It is more elegant, cosmetically, with brass hardware, and pretty cherrywood. (won't help you take better pictures, but the chicks dig it)
    The Shen has more movement, and can shoot a shorter lens. I like the sheepskin bellows on the Tach better than the papery bellows of the Shen. They are both very good cameras for the money.
    A friendly pointer on terminology, field cameras are view cameras. The cameras you are referring to that have more movements than a field, are called monorails, and they are view cameras as well.
    Welcome to the darkslide.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    They've got an 8x10 for 610 Euros and it's only 2kgs???
    Yep, I am looking into a horisontal 5x7 Explorer. I estimate I'll get the weight down to between 1 and 1.2 kgs with lens. The build time for the camera should be 1 to 2 months. István is a nice guy. I think he has a lot to do, so don't expect an answer in three seconds flat.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #16

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    Would they do an 11x14 in just landscape mode?

  7. #17
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    Nick,

    I think they would. They mention of a 24x24" they've done and they are very clearly interested in making "the camera of your dreams" - so why don't you get in touch with them?
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    Nick,
    so why don't you get in touch with them?
    They'd want to be paid :o Maybe after Christmas.

    11x14 landscape mode. Plus 8x10 reducing back. Bails on both. 120mm to 650mm bellows. Sounds pretty good

  9. #19
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    New to LF

    I don't want to start an argument but I have found my linhof Tech III to be everything I ever need in a view camera plus easy and convienent to use. Yes its old but far from wore out. It will handle lenses up to 360mm and does fine with my 90mm SA. There is an MMP forsale in the classifieds with a lens and this should also be a perfect starter.
    As to front shift and rise I find that i have used them more often than not in outdoor landscape work.
    No escaping it!
    I must step on fallen leaves
    to take this path

  10. #20

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    For the type of work you describe I'd suggest the Tachihara. You'll appreciate the 2+ pound weight savings in the field, the extra inch of bellows extension that allows you to use a 300mm normal lens without going through the Shen Hao front standard gyrations, and the fact that you can use lenses as wide as 65mm (some say 58mm) without the inconvenience (and cost) of a bag bellows. The extra couple movements the Shen Hao has aren't needed for landscape work. I used a Polaroid back and the Calumet 6x7 roll film holder without any problem on the Tachihara I used to own. However, the Shen Hao is a fine camera too so you won't go wrong if that's what you choose.

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