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  1. #21
    Pragmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i shoot architectural photos for work too ...
    i use a little toyo cx.
    admittedly, it is inexpensive, and it doesnt' have all the bells+whistles as a sinar ...

    even though it isn't "top of the line"
    it can take a bag bellows, and all sorts of toyo accessories.
    if you have LONG lenses you might consider a camera that can take a really long rail --- i use lenses from 65mm - a 210/370.

    good luck!

    -john
    Second on this. Its light and can be toted around mounted on the tripod with relative ease. I just sold mine (moving to 8x10) but it was used quite successfully with a number of HABS level architectural documentation projects; exteriors, interiors, and entire domestic/landscape documentation. Sinar is great, but it is an expensive overkill outside of the studio...
    Patrick

    something witty and profound needs to be inserted here...

  2. #22

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    Panfield

    I doubt that you will find anything that beats it. They seem very light, easy to use and rugged.

    I've had one for about 4 years and am fond of it.

  3. #23
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    I'll second the use of the Sinar Norma for photographing architecture. I used to do a fair amount of commercial work, using the 4x5 size. Then I got an 8x10 back for landscape shooting. Now I have a sizable portion of the Norma system, and a 5x7 back. That is something new and different for me.

  4. #24
    Petzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    I'm looking for the best option specifically for specialising in shooting architecture.
    Any decent monorail!
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  5. #25

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    Tristan

    Well I'll put my two cents in a SInar F1 with bag bellows In my opinion it's a cut above. Plus the Swing tilt and all movement are a breeze because they show you how with the controls in the back and the ground glass is set up to give help with a wide angle bellows and your choice your in like Flyn whoever he might be

    ROn

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil View Post
    Tristian, not familiar with your camera, but here is what I would recommend to you. Any decent 4x5 with a bag bellows and a good selection of short lenses with center filters if you start using the really tight stuff. The long lenses aren't going to be as important (to me) as are the short ones, which require plenty of coverage and movements at short focal lengths. Best, tim
    don't forget the recessed lensboard.....

  7. #27
    Ole
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    The Carbon Infinity is great, but out of production and only rarely available in the second-hand market.

    It handles anything from 65mm to 600mm lenses without "special tricks"; you get down to 30mm with a bag bellows. Movements are adequate for anything. It's portable - in its own carbon fiber shell.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #28
    Frank Szabo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    I'm looking for the best option specifically for specialising in shooting architecture.
    Anyone got any ideas?
    I'm currently using a hand-made Panfield by Andrew Meintjies.
    Anyone else got one or one that beats it?

    Tristan McLaren
    Build quality and precise yet generous movements are much more important than brand names.

    Perhaps I've got a rather crude outlook, but a LF camera isn't much more than an expensive shoe box. Concentrate on your optics instead of cmaera brands. Just go shopping. Read a lot of specs.

    The best camera is the one you like - don't worry about the rest of us dummies.

  9. #29
    Sparky's Avatar
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    You KNOW you guys are responding to a post that's over a year old, right..?

  10. #30

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    I know this is an old thread, but it's interesting ...

    Silvestri T30.

    Made by Italians; built in Florence; very specialized for architecture.

    Advantages:

    - stable shift mechanism with good range (equivalent to front rise)
    - rigidity non-pareil
    - excellent portability
    - Rodenstock & Schneider lenses on helical focus mounts
    - lens range from ultrawide (35mm) to normal (150mm)
    - 6x7, 6x9 & 4x5 formats on Graflok

    Disadvantages:

    - not an all-purpose platform
    - you'd have to be very creative to hand hold this and shoot portraits, but ...

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