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  1. #31

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    an interesting read! keep us updated!

    for checking the coverage of your lenses and light leaks in general, you could use a paper negative (must be cheaper and easy to process to see the result)

  2. #32

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    Actually Nige, I did use the paper neg method to discover the light leaks. And after seeing where they were located on the paper negative, they were actually small hairline cracks in the darkslide.

    These were easily located by placing the darkslide on a lit light table in the dark room, and covering the remainder of the light table with black cloth (in the dark of course). After letting my eyes adjust to the darkness, I turned on the light table and immediatly found the culprates.

    To make sure the slides wre completely fixed, I decided to completely cover the inside of the slides with a black-out film, which I had used on the windows in my darkroom. A sort of VERY stickly opaque black film, I cut it to coer the entire inside of the slide, but not covering the edges that run in the tracks. This solved the problem and now I can bring the filmholder out into the light without fear of fogging.
    - William Levitt

  3. #33

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Nige @ Jan 28 2003, 02:30 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> for checking the coverage of your lenses and light leaks in general, you could use a paper negative (must be cheaper and easy to process to see the result) </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I have done that too, and then contact printed it to get a positive. It was a fun experiment.

  4. #34

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    Sorry for dragging this off topic for just a second, but how do you contact print a paper negative? Wouldn&#39;t it be all diffuse if you shine light through it from the back side?


    Sorry. Back to the topic at hand...

    dgh
    David G Hall

  5. #35

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    I&#39;m only guessing as I don&#39;t know any theory behind this, but when the two pieces of paper are touching the light has nowhere to difuse. I only contact print pinhole images which are soft to begin with but they look are sharp as the negative

  6. #36

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    You contact print it just as if you were using a negative, placing the papers with emulsions facing each other. It just takes more light and/or more time.

  7. #37

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    I thought I heard somewhere too that sometimes they would treat paper negs with an oily substance to make it more translucent. Or is this just a myth?
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  8. #38

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    You could treat the negative with some sort of oily or waxy stuff but you don&#39;t necessarily have to.

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