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  1. #1

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    OK people, I've done the searches and have come up with little to no information about view cameras (field camera design) in the size 12X15", which is roughly 30X40cm.

    I just bought one on the German Ebay, together with a brass barrel 480 "Voss/Goerz" lens.
    The camera has a glass plate holder and film in that size is available from Webphota in Berlin (among others I'm sure).

    Question: Does anyone have any information or links that might be helpful in researching this camera a bit more?

    - William Levitt

  2. #2
    clay's Avatar
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    I am dreadfully sorry to inform you that you have now been infected with the ultra large camera virus. There is no known cure for this disease, whose symptons include scouring ebay for anything labelled 'dagor' or 'wide field', buying film in lots of 500 sheets, purchasing refrigerators to store the film, and the irrritating habit of referring to 8x10 as a "miniature" format. There is no know cure for this aflliction, other than eventual abdication to a bad back and joint tendinitis. If you begin to entertain thoughts of capturing sports event on in-camera 16x20 negatives, you MUST check into the nearest Betty Ford clinic. Tell them to give you the same treatment regimen that they used on me.

    Clay
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  3. #3

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (clay @ Nov 22 2002, 06:38 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>you MUST check into the nearest Betty Ford clinic. Tell them to give you the same treatment regimen that they used on me.

    Clay</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Yeah and it did not work so you might as well save your money for film....

    Good to see you here Clay&#33;

  4. #4

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    After shooting 8X10 for many years, I am looking forward to expanding my horizons in the field of ULF photography. I will however be keeping my 8X10" camera for those trips where I feel as though lugging a "large" camera will be too taxing...

    As far as film is concerned, the availability of this format in boxes of 25 sheets from Webphota.de was one of the reasons I decided to buy this camera. Euro 78,00 for 25 sheets of 30X40 ASA 25/100 or 400. I&#39;m sure I can get Ilford cut to size, or Efke, but not without having to buy large amounts myself. That was another consideration. I haven&#39;t heard of anybody using this format, so "co-opping" film will be highly unlikely.

    Can anybody provide either info or possible links where I can further investigate this format?

    Thanks&#33;
    - William Levitt

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Maybe the Wephota people can tell you who else buys the film. It can&#39;t be a long list&#33;

    And does this plate holder work with film or have a sheet film adapter, or are you looking at spending more than you did on the camera to have them custom made?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

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    After discussing this matter of using the current plateholder with modern film with the previous owner, as well as gathering info from internet forums, I&#39;ll first try the method of "backing" the film with either a glass plate or a metal plate cut to the same size as the film. The holder has springs which will press the plate (either glass or metal) / film "sandwich" against the front frame of the film holder. In case that is insufficent at preventing film sag, I&#39;ll then use a spray mount from GEPE which has the stickyness of those yellow post-it note pads. It is sold through a company here in Germany called Monochrom for this very purpose. It is ph neutral, and stays tacky for quite some time.

    But to answer your question David, even IF I were to have the camera modified, and a couple of filmholder made up, the total price for the camera, modifications, Goerz lens and holders would STILL be cheaper than the current market prices for either new or used banquet cameras.

    Needless to say, I got a GREAT price on this outfit. Every once in awhile bargings can still be found on Ebay, but they are becoming increasingly harder to find.
    - William Levitt

  7. #7

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    Well, here is some new info regarding this camera.It was made by a company called Thornton &Pickard in England and was introduced in 1907. The lens is a Ross of London, Goerz 19inch Double Anastigmat f 7.7
    The plate holders are designed for use with a 15X12" glass plate (if you do a search using 12X15 you come up empty, but using 15X12 you get several google hits). I will be having 2 film sheaths of the appropriate size made. The film is then loaded into the sheaths, and then layed in the holder as if it were a glass plate. The design is rather simple so it shouldn&#39;t be too costly to have made.

    Strangly enough, now that I know the origon of this camera, I&#39;ve run across several of them (in smaller sizes of course) on ebay. The 15X12" camera was referred to as a "full plate" and smaller size cameras were called "half plate" "quarter plate" etc.

    I can&#39;t wait to make the first exposure&#33;
    - William Levitt

  8. #8

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (William Levitt @ Dec 1 2002, 08:45 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Strangly enough, now that I know the origon of this camera, I&#39;ve run across several of them (in smaller sizes of course) on ebay. The 15X12" camera was referred to as a "full plate" and smaller size cameras were called "half plate" "quarter plate" etc.</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Hi William,

    This is interesting - I&#39;ve always been under the impression &#39;full plate&#39; was 6.5x8.5 inches. Does this mean there was a size difference between U.S. and English &#39;full plate&#39;? Anyways, like most &#39;old English woodies&#39; it looks fantastic&#33;

    Cheers,
    Roger...

  9. #9

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    I got this information from an English Website dicussing the history of camera, English products in particular. Of course I wasn&#39;t smart enough to bookmark the page. But the referral to "full plate" was in direct reference to the introduction of the 15X12" camera in 1907 in England.

    Found it

    http://www.usinternet.com/users/rniederman/univ1.htm


    "In 1907, Thornton Pickard listed the "New Model" in sizes from 1/4-plate to 15" X 12" and the original model in sizes from Postcard to 10" X 8". Apparently the original models offered were unsold remnant stock since they carried very low prices."




    - William Levitt

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That doesn&#39;t imply that "full plate" refers to 15x12", but that this was the largest size they made, and that quarter plate was the smallest. I&#39;ve always been under the impression as well that "full plate" referred to 8.5x6.5, though there in fact were plates made larger than full plate.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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