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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    I'll be going 8x10 soon and was curious about wind problems. Sometimes you can get a calm day in New Zealand, but most of the coastal areas (where I'll be living) almost alwyas have a breeze or moderate to strong wind. Can these issues be dealt with using faster shutter speed, wind blocking devices, etc? Curious how others handle this obstacle. Thanks, Sean

  2. #2
    bmac's Avatar
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    I hope you've been pumping iron. Time to buy a heavy tripod! Make sure all the movements are locked down tight.
    hi!

  3. #3
    Sean's Avatar
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (bmacphoto.com @ Nov 30 2002, 06:45 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I hope you&#39;ve been pumping iron. &nbsp;Time to buy a heavy tripod&#33; &nbsp;Make sure all the movements are locked down tight.</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Well, there are lots of sheep around here. I could always strap my gear onto a sheep.




  4. #4
    lee
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    Wind is an issue. I recommend a faster film. LIke something in the 400 speed range. You don&#39;t need to "improve" the grain for contact printing and you will get at least one more stop out of that speed film. I was in the Big Bend National Park last summer and it was hot and windy. My shooting mate was prone to 100 (FP4) and was bitching all the time about the long times and slow shutter speeds. My film showed no movement at all. His did.

    lee

  5. #5

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (lee @ Dec 2 2002, 05:12 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>My shooting mate was prone to 100 (FP4) and was bitching all the time about the long times and slow shutter speeds. My film showed no movement at all. His did.

    lee</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    And you did not lend him any film? some friend you are&#33;

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It&#39;s an issue. Faster film is a good solution. So is a folding umbrella. I often block the wind with my body or stabilize the camera by resting a hand on the part that seems to be vibrating. Sometimes you just have to wait. If you&#39;ve got high wind and fast moving clouds, this might mean waiting for the light to come from behind the clouds, for the cloud formation to be attractive, and for the wind to stop all at once. In some places it can be frustrating enough, that I just shoot a smaller format.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7
    Sean's Avatar
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    Cool,, unless I&#39;m in Wellington NZ then I should be able to get by with waiting for the wind to die down, or a golf umbrella. I have also seen special wind blocking kits custom designed for LF photography. But maybe you pay them 250 bucks and the send you an umbrella <grin>

  8. #8

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    I have used the golf umbrella idea, or moving my jeep upwind of the camera position, or waiting and waiting and waiting, but the most reliable solution is often a Fuji GSW690.

  9. #9

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    Buy a c-1.
    art is about managing compromise

  10. #10

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    Very good advice, thus far. Tripod, head, windbreaks, fast film, etc.

    But nothing has improved my success rate in wind so much as replacing my wooden view camera with a rigid metal monorail or drop bed camera.

    It sometimes feels like you&#39;re moving an artillery piece into position, but if you work in a consistantly breezy environment, it would be worth serious consideration.

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