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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Omaha, Nebraska
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    You can hike with th ULF cameras. I can't remember where, but a few years ago i read an article about someone hiking with an 11x14 camera. He basically modified an old backpack rack to hold camera, film and tripod. I beleive he had a tripod modified so he could break it down into the seperate head and legs in able to better balance the load. I myself have a problem knee, injured and operated on a couple of different times and it can be difficult for me to backpack a load of that size.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    51
    I'm not sure what qualifies as a "hike" but I frequently walk several miles into the local forest reserve with my 7x17 Korona rig. Camera with lens, focus hood, two film holders fits into a backpack I bought at a camping supply place. I haven't found or figured out a rig that will let me backpack my 12x20.

  3. #13

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    Nov 2002
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    Southern Cal
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    In my book that counts as a hike, even without the camera, holders, tripod etc etc etc. Especially since in spite of what science says, I know that more of it is uphill than downhill, both ways.

  4. #14
    Marv's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    Eastern Iowa
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    If I use a tripod with a my 6X7 and truly compose an image in the view finder it takes nearly the same time as with the 4X5 or 8X10. If I hap-harzardly compose an image, letting it float in the finder hoping to crop it in the darkroom it takes less time. Unfortunately I lose that time when I get in the darkroom and try to remember what it was I was trying to capture.
    For me it is the "seeing" that takes the time, regardless of format.

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