Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,939   Posts: 1,557,408   Online: 916
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    I think everybody agrees 4x5 tends to take longer then smaller formats. Leading to less exposures being made. A comment I've seen is that even larger formats take even longer then 4x5. Is this true? If so why? Is it just the extra effort of moving the larger cameras? Or ? I'd think that the larger ground glass would make it easier to see what you're doing versus 4x5. Personally I think a 6x6 tlr is easier to visualize the final image over a 35mm and a 4x5 is easier then the tlr. Even with the world being upside down and backwards-))

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Personally I have not found any more time needed between my 4x5 and the 8x10....they work just about the same. Now the 12x20 is another matter, and that is mainly because of the logistics of mounting the camera by myself on the tripod, not an easy thing to do. Once the camera is mounted though the process is the same as the 4x5.....and with only one lens sometimes is even faster, as I dont have the temptaion of changing lenses to see what different focal lenghts will do.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,359
    Images
    20
    One issue is that the smaller the format, the easier it is to carry more film, and the less costly the film. I think this is the major difference. With 8x10", 10 sheets would be a productive day for me. With 4x5" and a few Grafmatics, I feel like I've got my sheet-film motor drive on.

    Another is the larger the format the longer the lenses, and the shorter the DOF, so a little more attention to focus may be required, but not that much more.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    I hadn't thought about the depth of field. The weight issue makes sense to me. How big is a 12x20 camera? I sketched out what a 11x14 back would look like and that seems too big to carry.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Yeah well needless to say I am not hauling the thing up Mt. EVerest. I do the Weston thing with the 12x20...if it is further away than 100 yards from the car..it is not photogenic anymore.
    To answer you question about the size, my Korona is 23 x 20 in the back and when open it can go up to 25 inches in lenght. Bellows draw is 30 inches since there is 4 inches recessed at the back and an extra inch at the lens board.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    Robert, I think you may be refering to a reply I made to an earlier post. I stated that for me, 11x14 takes more time because 1) I have a limited number of film holders compared to 4x5 and 2) the film is much more expensive per exposure and development. Therefore I take longer to determine the exact composition, focus points, exposure etc. With 4x5 I sometimes have as many as 20 film holders in the car. When I am shooting something I can afford two exposures or even more with filtration, different lens etc. With 11x14 (and to a lesser extent 8x10) I don't have that luxury.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    For 11x14 it is usually pretty close to the car, although I have modified an old golf bag cart with bigger wheels that at least lets me move over somewhat rough terrain or long distances on pavement.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    Actually I was afraid it wouldn't fit in the back of the truck-))

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Robert @ Dec 4 2002, 08:19 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Actually I was afraid it wouldn&#39;t fit in the back of the truck-))</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    ....is not that bad Robert...

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    When I got my 4x5 it came in a great big grey case. Opened it up and was kind of wondering where the camera was-)) Took me awhile to notice the little thing in the middle of the case. The case is so big I could put all my film holders in one end. Plus my two lens. Put a 35mm and a few lens in the middle section. The final section would still have enough room for lunch and dinner for two -)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin