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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    63
    Does anyone here use or has comments on the new Canham 8x10" metal ? Weaknesses, rigidity, etc...

    Thank you all.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    11
    I wants comments for this cam too.
    Best wishes,
    Marcel

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    963
    I had a chance to handle it at my dealer's when it first came out. I came away very impressed. More limited movement on the rear end then his other cameras, but providing greater rigidity as a result. it weight is about 9 pounds. you can probably check Keith's website to get an idea as to movements, but they seemed more than adequate for a field camera.

    Definite prefab metal feel to it too... you might have to decide if you're more of a wooden camera person.

    If I wanted an 8x10 field camera, this one would be at the top of my list.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilmette,Illinois, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    728
    I've had an 8x10 metal Canham for about 6 weeks and like it a lot. I use 240mm and 355mm G Clarons with it and find it rigid and quick to set up and use. It has more than adequate movements for what I do. I don't miss having more extensive rear movements-it was a fair tradeoff for less weight and greater rigidity. The groundglass is bright and easy to focus. I even like that it is not a wood camera, but a very elegant modern looking machine. I'm very glad that I bought one, any other questions?
    Richard

  5. #5
    PJC
    PJC is offline

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    35
    Greetings,

    I've been using the metal 8x10 for close to a year now and love it. You have to realize that no camera will do everything perfectly, as each design makes some trade offs and the Canham is no exception.

    The Canham folds into a nice, fairly light package and sets up/breaks down quickly. The ground glass uses the same fresnel as his 4x5 and it's a true joy to view the image on the ground glass; once you see it, you'll be hooked.

    The only drawback I have found, and it's minor, are the two knobs on the rear that lock the rear standard and move the rear standard. Both of these knobs are in close proximity to each other and are the same size, so it's easy to grab one and think you're on the other, but it's really not a big deal.

    If you have any specific questions don't hesitate to ask, but I'll say it now, I'm biased; I love the camera!

    Regards, Pete

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    63
    My original question was posted in january 2003, thank you for your answers :-). I've bought a JMC 810 at the beginning of february 2003, one year and two months ago, and I'm very happy with it after several hundred of films. Quick and easy to fold and unfold (I do that very often to look on the ground glass), very light with enough rigidity (it's not a Sinar P !), very well crafted, with a modern and discret look pleasant for my taste. Well designed for landscape use, good front movements, especially rise and fall (which can be inverted), and a bit of shift (I sometimes use it) and swing. I never missed the lack of rear movements. Just a complaint about the tightening of the back : the camera is not very rigid, the back doesn't move, it's rather springy, but if one does not tighten it carefully, it can move a bit when one introduces the film holder. Good ground glass and Fresnel, clear but not very contrasty, the camera is sold without GG protector. Good flexible bellows. For overseas buyers, it would be a good idea to provide with the camear some US hex keys (hard to find here in Europe) and some replacement washers and bolts. The three rear knobs are very close to each other, but no problem to use them. Despite the sometimes chaotic sliding of the rails aluminium against aluminium (easy to set), the camera is very fluid to use.

    I use it with a heavy 155 (a Sinaron W - a Grandagon in fact - weighing 1.5 kg), and light 240, 305, 450 and 600. No problem with the 155, rigidity is OK, I only miss perhaps 1 cm of rise with the standard bellows. No rigidity problem nor vibrations with the long extension of the 600, all the pictures are sharp. I am waiting now for a 5x7" reducing back. I wrote to Keith canham to know the release date for this back, but I had no answer.



 

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