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  1. #11

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    Your style of camera is called a "tail-board camera" and was one of the most common types of large format cameras in the 19th and very early 20th century.

  2. #12

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    I've got a century no. 7. It's a nice camera. These cameras are simple and extremely sturdy. Someone like Richard Ritter would have no problem making a back for it. I have an 8x10 and 5x7 for mine, and possible a 4x5 as well.

    If you just want to use it, you could easily make a back out of baltic birch plywood and a spare back from just about any camera.

    I bet the lens would be great for portraits. Does it have a packard shutter mounted behind the lens?

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter De Smidt View Post
    . Someone like Richard Ritter would have no problem making a back for it. I have an 8x10 and 5x7 for mine, and possible a 4x5 as well.


    If you just want to use it, you could easily make a back out of baltic birch plywood and a spare back from just about any camera.

    I bet the lens would be great for portraits. Does it have a packard shutter mounted behind the lens?
    sorry for the questions but i have no analog experience whatsoever..with the exception of a few years with a nikon n90s...

    1-do you have contact information for mr ritter?
    2- do you have more information about making one myself?
    3, no no shutter of anykind, when the lens is removed you can see all the way through the bellows to the front of the back..


    im rather interested in using this camera in the studio, im assuming ill be developing them myself? is there a faq somewhere as to how? again, sorry for the ignorant questions... thanks

  4. #14
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    I have a complete 8X10 back for sale in the ads here at APUG

    http://www.apug.org/classifieds/show...cat=500&page=1

    You would take this back and do whatever little carpentry was required for it to go on your camera and you'd be ready to go with 8X10.

    Here are a couple of pics of the packard shutter installation in my old Kodak 2D. A Packard shutter simply sits behind the lens and opens and closes by pneumatic pressure. They're extremely versatile and reliable.





    When you have a minute and you're bored, flip through some of my web pages. Many images and portraits made with a camera just like yours. In fact the portrait of Jon Wilson on this page was made with a 16" Beach and an 11X14 Deardorff.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by avenfoto View Post
    sorry for the questions but i have no analog experience whatsoever..with the exception of a few years with a nikon n90s...

    1-do you have contact information for mr ritter?
    2- do you have more information about making one myself?
    3, no no shutter of anykind, when the lens is removed you can see all the way through the bellows to the front of the back..


    im rather interested in using this camera in the studio, im assuming ill be developing them myself? is there a faq somewhere as to how? again, sorry for the ignorant questions... thanks
    See Richard Ritter's site at: http://www.lg4mat.net/

    Jim Galli's back would be fairly easy to attach. If you bought a back, and sent it with the back plate of the camera to Richard, he'd do a professional job.

    Regarding making it your self, remember that a camera is nothing but a light-tight box with some adjustment. Look how the current back is attached. You can either dismantle/cut out a section of the old back and attach a back, such as Jim's, or you can make something that replaces the back. I'd have to have a look at my camera to see how this is done. Remember that you want to be able to change orientation. The time I did something similar, I used a Sinar 4x5 frame and back. The frame allowed me to change the back from horizontal to vertical. I simply machined a piece of plywood such that it would fit on an old Agfa 5x7 camera. This worked perfectly fine, but it looked a little odd.

    Regarding using it, check out your library. They often have books about how to use the view camera. (Steve Simmons has one, and there are others. Sinar used to publish some neice books on view camera technique.) It really isn't that hard, especially with a portrait camera. You won't be using many movements. You'll only have back tilt, swing and shift. The hardest part will be to get good focus. With big lenses like this the depth of field is very small, and if the subject moves a bit they'll be out of focus.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by avenfoto View Post
    attached are the requested photos...

    badge1_lores is on the front of the body
    badge2_lores is on the side of the focus mechanism
    lens2hot_lores i took the curves way up to bring out the engraving on the lens itself..
    lens3_lores shows the aperature mechanisms (and quite a bit of reflections, its been a long day..)

    and the rest are fairly self-explanatory...

    the bellows definatley leak, as there are holes in the majority of flex corners

    thanks for your help
    Well making bellows for that camera would be very easy compared to the small bellows I made. I would take a couple evenings after you got the materials. The ground glass if you grid it your self would take an evening also. But purchasing the Bellows Back and Ground Glass would be very costly.
    It's not the camera......

  7. #17
    JosBurke's Avatar
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    ""Perhaps lenses designed for Florida were called "Beach" "' Naw, a beach is called a beach cause I was married to one and the name is appropriate--she's a beach--what more can I say?
    Joseph Burke

  8. #18

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    interested in selling the lens...

    so times are tough(er), and i need to purchase some more practical bigticket items, so id be interested in selling the lens in the images.
    its been properly stored since i originally posted. i can take more images if requested.

    does anyone have an estimate of the worth? id be open to a fair deal to anyone....

  9. #19

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    PM sent.

    Garrett

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