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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    I am using an Arca Swiss F Compact, the one with the folding rail. 4x5. And I can't seem to figure out a great effective, efficient way to pack it so that it's quickly available for use. it is quite compact in the bag when I slide the rail out of the standards, but it is a time consuming hassle to slide the rail back in every time I shoot. With the rail folded it is pretty compact but very tall, so it doesn't really fit in any bag I have. When I put it in a backpack there is always a rail end sticking out somewhere.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks!

    dgh
    David G Hall

  2. #2
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Jan 2003
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    So. Utah
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  3. #3

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    Sep 2002
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    In Dykingas book (LF Nature Photography, I think) he shows how he packs his AS monorail into a Lowepro Super Trekker and he packs his lenses in Gnass lens cases. I think that despite being expensive, the Super Trekker is probably the way to go as far as backpacking major LF kit, unless you fancy padding and sectioning a bespoke climbing/backpacking rucsac. The Super Trekker appears heavy when empty but the carrying system is probably the best in photo backpack and once loaded and on your back it does feel lighter than you imagine!! BTW, the Gnass cases are really well made and are available from Justin Gnass via his web site, www.gnassgear.com

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    14
    Why not just get a Field camera? Thats what they're ment for, backpacking and travel.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    Good question. I actually am lucky enough to have both an Ebony and the Arca. I noticed recently that even though I got the Ebony for just this reason, I always gravitate toward the Arca Swiss. Maybe I am more familiar with it, maybe it's because the movements are more extensive, I don't know. I realized that virtually all of my best 4x5 images, the ones where the camera was really second nature and at its best as a tool, are from the monorail.

    So I thought I would think more seriously about how top pack it more efficiently, and maybe even sell the field camera once I figure it out.

    dgh

    David G Hall

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Just north of the Inferno
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    IIRC Dykinga often goes out with a 50lb+ pack on when he is working. And he travels pretty light considering. He doesn't have a tent, just a bivy bag and some some powerbars. Pretty hardcore.
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  7. #7
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    I ran into this problem last Fall when I decided to try taking my old Toyo View out into the field. I didn't want to be limited to working out of my trunk or disassembling and reassembling everything for every shot or busting my *ss trying to wrestle the camera, tripod, etc. more than a few yards.

    My solution was to design a small wooden frame with wheels that can be clamped between two legs of my tripod, effectively turning it into a hand truck. The camera can either be left in place on top of the pod or bungeed onto the frame which lowers the center of gravity and makes it an even lighter pull. Either way the camera doesn't need to be disassembled at all.

    I designed it as I was building it and the miracle (aside from managing to avoid sawing off or drilling holes through any essential parts of my anatomy), is that in the first few field tests it has been a joy to use, allowing me to trek far beyond the boundries of the parking lot with little hassle.

    Obviously, this wouldn't serve for long distance backpacking photo treks but it bounces right along over rough ground and deafall and lets you get as far away from the road as your incentive and energy allow.

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #8

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    Sep 2002
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    Neal, can you upload a pic of your setup? This sounds like a good idea for my 12x20. So far I am following Weston's idea....if it is 100 feet away from the car it is not photogenic anymore!

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    470
    Yeah, Neal,

    I would love to see a picture of that too. What a great idea! And just to be clear, I don't have backpacking in mind. But I want to be able to venture SOME distance from the car.

    dgh

    David G Hall

  10. #10
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    I'll take a few shots of it on the end of my next roll and post them soon. You'll have to change the design to fit your own tripod but that should be a simple adaptation.

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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