Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,573   Posts: 1,545,676   Online: 878
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 12 of 12
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    357
    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Feb 19 2003, 01:52 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>if I photographed the same scene with a Schneider and a Congo or a Fuji, let&#39;s say, and made prints to whatever size you felt you needed, could you tell the difference?</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    David,

    It is hard to tell the difference between modern LF lenses as long as sharpness and/or brilliance it your main concern. You may be able to tell the difference in the outer areas of the image circle and for lower f-stop values. However, there are other aspects to take into account. If you need maximum coverage, there is currently no alternative to Schneider, at least for some focals. If size and weight is a primary issue, you’ll have to pick lenses from almost all manufacturers (e.g. Schneider 4,5/80XL, Congo 6,3/90, Rodenstock 5,6/135, Nikkor-M 9/300, Fujinon-C 12.5/450)

    IMO, comparing lenses is merely like comparing TMX vs. Delta 100. Both are sharp but do have different characters in detail. If you take a closer look at the out-of-focus rendering (the so calles bokeh), you may be able to differentiate between modern lenses more clearly. It is a matter of personal taste in the end. I, e.g., do not like the shorter focal Fujinon, but I love my Fujinon-C 12.5/450. So it is not a matter of comparing Fujinon vs. Rodenstock, but of comparing e.g. a certain Grandagon-N with a certain Fujinon SW(D) or simply: picking the best from all lines according your needs and likes.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    1,030
    FWIW, I think you&#39;d get more of a difference between various types of lenses than makes. Depending on what you&#39;re shooting, you might be able to work this to you&#39;re advantage if you&#39;ve got a selection with you to choose from. Right now I have three lenses very close in focal length: A 10"/250mm WF Ektar, a 240mm G-Claron, and a 10.4" Cooke. They each have a distinctly different "look" I find I can use to my advantage, depending on the subject, contrast, and light. Thats really part of the fun of vintage glass(though the G-Claron isn&#39;t exactly vintage&#33 I doubt if you&#39;d have this much variation among like focal lengths in plasmats by contemporary manufacturers like Schneider, Nikkor, and Rodenstock. Good light&#33;

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin