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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    Jorge had recommended turning a LF lens sideways to make it easier to work from the behind the cloth and easier to set the aperture in general.

    I did it tonight...it's GREAT. Funny how the simpliest things excite me. I turned it so the aperture lever is on the right, which made the cabel release point straight down. So no danger whatsoever of the cable being in front of the lens.

    It's a cool little trick. Thanks!

    dgh
    David G Hall

  2. #2

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    Sep 2002
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    You know what the funny thing is? Every time I mention it to a LF photographer, I get a blank stare...and they go right away to do it, then they tell me, why didnt I think of that? Also I think is funne you se those ads of Cole Weston etc....fiddling with the camera on their tippy toes...lol...

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    New Jersey
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    Doesn't turning the lens sideways make all your horizontals into verticals?

    I love the question, when photographing with a view camera in public, "Why is the picture upside down?" you explain that all lenses take pictures upside down, including their own cameras. they invariably get very disconcerted and upset, as if the camera they thought they knew and loved has been lying to them.

  4. #4

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    Jorge,
    What a great idea. I certainly had not thought of it. But it makes perfect sense. Thanks for sharing that with us.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Pikes Peak
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    Boy do I feel stupid. I never realized there was a top or bottom to a LF lens. I always just mounted it whatever way would work but since I use a Linhof there are only a couple of options on most shutters. You guys with your BIG lensboards get to play.

    BTW how is right side up determined, lettering on shutter?

  6. #6
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  7. #7

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    BobF, there is not a "top" or bottom per se, but most people for some reason tend to put the aperture scale facing up, and then when they are setting it, have to stand on their toes to see what the aperture is. I have linhof boards and it works with all kinds of boards.

  8. #8

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    Sep 2002
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    After I wrote that I started thinking (not my usual pastime) and realized that the mounting limitations I have are not only because of the camera or aperture location, but are actually as much caused by the slotted carry case I use and the fact that I leave a cable mounted. That probably doesn't make a lot of sense either, you'd have to see the carry case to understand.


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    470
    I think most of us put the lens on shutter lever up because all other lettering is then facing up. Specifically, the word "Copal" faces up when the shutter lever is on top.

    dgh

    David G Hall

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    51
    Doesn't everybody put the lens with the aperture lever to the right?

    Actually, this is something that surprises almost every workshop student. A second, really useful trick is to figure out how far you've stopped the lens down--that is, see if you get to f/32 when the aperture lever is one finger-width from the shutter cocking lever. Once you find the landmark, you can stop down to f/32 (or f/45 or whatever) to see if depth of field is adequate, all without coming out from under the focusing hood.

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