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  1. #1

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    HABS photographers Fuji-Acros vs. Tmax

    Just found out from Fuji that the Acros 100 4x5 quickloads are not on a polyester base and therefore do not qualify for the most stringent Library of Congress archival standards (500 years). Maybe this is old news to HABS-HAER photographers, but I couldn't find it anywhere. I was hoping to use the ACROS quickloads for a couple of projects. looks like i'll be shooting the TMAX readyloads (on Estar thick base).

    Here is the response from FUJI:
    Dear Mr. Schafer,

    Thank you for contacting FUJIFILM, USA's Helpdesk Center. Please allow
    us to assist you.
    Acros 4x5 black & white quickload film is a cellulose triacelate base
    .

  2. #2

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    hi there

    this is good to know, thanks!
    i never submit other than tmax and occasionally plus x ..
    knowing what is not allowed helps,
    at least now i know ilford is still good

    good luck with your project!

    john
    ask me how ..

  3. #3

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    Maybe since Efke and Rollei 's 120 films are on a polyester base they will be acceptable for some HABS-HAER work? Sorta kidding!

  4. #4

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    g'day all

    plz explain HABS-HAER

  5. #5

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    hi ray

    habs/haer is the historic american building survey / historic american engineering record.
    in the united states if a property is 50 years old, possesses historic
    significance a red flag goes up if there is a state / federally planned,
    designed or paid for project ( highway projects too ). there is a review
    process called section 106 review, which is the historic preservation part of
    the environmental assessment. if a property has enough significance
    the government asks for a detailed written report, 4x5, 5x7 or 8x10 format
    negatives and contact prints ( all archival &C ) and sometimes measured\drawings.
    these are all submitted to the state historic preservation office ( shpo )
    reviewed and sent to the habs office and then off to the federal archives.
    over the years lots and lots of things have been documented from bridges
    to greenhouses. and over the years the federal program has asked for only
    "stuff" of significance on a national scale ( the best of the best sometimes ),
    so ... if a property has local significance, the states record it to their own
    standards. which are sometimes exactly like the federal government's, and
    sometimes are not quite the same.

    http://www.nps.gov/hdp/habs/index.htm
    Last edited by jnanian; 11-22-2007 at 07:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    ask me how ..

  6. #6

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    just to continue with John's assessment....this (HABS) was created back in FDR's administration (1930's) to put people back to work, along with architects, engineers, craftspeople, etc. HAER was created later and now HALS (?) for landscapes is the newest.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schafphoto View Post
    Just found out from Fuji that the Acros 100 4x5 quickloads are not on a polyester base and therefore do not qualify for the most stringent Library of Congress archival standards (500 years). Maybe this is old news to HABS-HAER photographers, but I couldn't find it anywhere. I was hoping to use the ACROS quickloads for a couple of projects. looks like i'll be shooting the TMAX readyloads (on Estar thick base).

    Here is the response from FUJI:
    Dear Mr. Schafer,

    Thank you for contacting FUJIFILM, USA's Helpdesk Center. Please allow
    us to assist you.
    Acros 4x5 black & white quickload film is a cellulose triacelate base
    .

    THIS IS INCORRECT. For those who can read Japanese, the data sheet for Acros sheet film, including 4x5 QL, is here:

    http://fujifilm.jp/support/pdf/filma...ssheet_001.pdf

    It states clearly that the base is 0.180mm polyester.

    The Fujifilm USA website does not have the datasheet for Acros sheet film, only the datasheet for Acros roll film, which is, of course, acetate. The only sense I can make of this is that the Fujifilm USA helpdesk staff simply reached for the nearest data sheet, read "cellulose triacetate", and didn't know enough to understand that sheet films are almost always on a different base.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schafphoto View Post
    Just found out from Fuji that the Acros 100 4x5 quickloads are not on a polyester base and therefore do not qualify for the most stringent Library of Congress archival standards (500 years). Maybe this is old news to HABS-HAER photographers, but I couldn't find it anywhere. I was hoping to use the ACROS quickloads for a couple of projects. looks like i'll be shooting the TMAX readyloads (on Estar thick base).

    Here is the response from FUJI:
    Dear Mr. Schafer,

    Thank you for contacting FUJIFILM, USA's Helpdesk Center. Please allow
    us to assist you.
    Acros 4x5 black & white quickload film is a cellulose triacelate base
    .
    I suspect Fujifilm USA is wrong; its Web site provides no technical information whatsoever on sheet sizes of Acros. Based on my handling of Acros sheets, they appear to be coated on polyester. That conclusion may be supported by this data sheet on Fuji Japan's Web site:

    http://fujifilm.jp/support/pdf/filma...ssheet_001.pdf

    I don't read Japanese but, in the first line of the final bulleted area of the data sheet's section 1, you'll see the letters PET. That stands for polyethylene terephthalate, a thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family. Hopefully, someone able to translate will validate or refute my conclusion. If I'm correct, you can happily go on using Acros.
    Last edited by Sal Santamaura; 11-22-2007 at 10:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    Oren posted while I was composing. Glad a Japanese speaker could verify my suspicion.

  10. #10

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    thnx for the explanation John

    an interesting concept

    a further question if i may, does this process save the subject from demolition, or is it a record of what is, or may be, lost?

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