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  1. #1

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    Alternate ways of mounting a lens (ie. no flange or retaining ring)

    So I've been hunting for a flange for my Ilex Acme-Synchro #3 and have had little success. I purchased one, which turns out to be for a Kodak Acme-Synchro #3, which for some reason is different from all other Acme-Synchro #3's. Carol at Flutots said she has one, but I think she may be on holidays as I have not yet received purchasing info. If that doesn't work out my only other option is to wait for SK Grimes to make a bunch, which is not unreasonable in cost at $35ish.

    In the meantime I am getting itchy to use my new lens! Searches at work for a filter which fits the rear threads (to scavenge the femal thread ring) have come up nil. Short of using a glue gun, are there any other alternate methods which will suffice until I get my hands on a proper flange?

    - Justin

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Rubber pipe-clamp will work- not pretty, but it functions... I don't remember what the OD on the Acme #3 shutter is, but it is probably something in the neighborhood of 1 1/2". Go find a pipe clamp that is close to that in size. You may need to cut out a wedge of it, and most likely will have to cut the thing in half (or less) lengthwise. Then just tighten the clamp until the rubber grips the rear barrel of the lens tightly.

  3. #3

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    Hi Justin,

    Here is my latest method which is pretty easy and cheap. It does require you to use wooden lens boards rather than metal (you didn't mention what type you have).

    First you cut a hole in the lens board approximately 1/16" larger than the outside diameter of the threads on the lens. I cut one approximately the same size as the threads and then use a dremmel with a small sanding drum to enlarge the hole in the board to the proper size. The sanding drum also smoothes out the edges of the hole very nicely.

    Next, put a piece of double sided scotch tape around the hole on the inside of the hole and trim it to the thickness of the board. Don't worry if it sounds like we going to tape the lens in place, this technique really works.

    Next, get a piece of 1/16" thick black foam from your local crafts shop - I got mine from Michaels for around 1$ for a sheet that is about 12" x 18". Cut a strip of foam the thickness of the lens board and cut it to length to fit inside the hole opening in the board.

    Tape it in place to the double stick tape. This will give you a lens board hole that is lined with foam.

    Next, you simply screw the lens into the foam "gasket" in the hole and it should fit very snugly and tight. It might take some work to get it started going in straight, but once it starts going in, it's pretty easy from there.

    I used this method on a 36 cm. Heliar in a 6 x 6 lens board for my 8 x 10 Kodak 2D (very big and very heavy lens) and it fits very tightly and secure. There is no worry about it falling out, and with the foam, there is not any chance of light leakage.

    With this method, there is no reason why I need to look for a mounting flange for the lens.

    Hope this helps - good luck,

    Dan

  4. #4

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    Thanks guys! The home depot and Michael's are in the same area, so I think a trip up there before work tomorrow is in order. I have metal lensboards on my Cambo, but one of my housemates is pretty handy with a dremel so if I offer up some coffee (and replacement bits) he'd be able to get the hole opened quite nicely. You are correct Scott, the diameter is 1.5". Dan, what is that foam normally used for? I'd think it is pretty dense but I'd like to know what to look for. There is a smaller craft shot right by work, so I will take a look there first. Thanks again,

    Justin

  5. #5

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    I've used hose clamps, nylon zip ties, duct tape.. I've use these three items to mount everything from an aero ektar and wollensak 15" telephoto to smaller lenses like 7" anastigmats. I like the foam gasket idea on a wood lensboard, that is pretty slick and i've done similar using a plastic diy lensboard and linen tape. If you don't care how it looks and only how it works, there are plenty of ways to stick anything on a board once you think about it.

  6. #6
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Cut a hole in a thin piece of sheet metal just slightly smaller than the maximum thread diameter. cut a slit about 3/8" long and bend one corner very slightly. This will now screw onto the thread well enough that a temporary fix has lasted over 20 years. Another idea would be to cut 3 or 4 small metal tabs and glue or screw them to the lensboard with the edge of the tabs engaging the thread.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  7. #7
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity, how are large diameter threads machined? I've never seen a tap & die set like that, but it would be nice to be able to thread 1 1/2" brass tube for making a home made lens or lens ring, etc.

  8. #8
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    A thick automotive "o" ring may work as well (3/16"). If it is a snug fit, you can roll or thread it onto the lens like a nut. tim

  9. #9
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Just out of curiosity, how are large diameter threads machined? I've never seen a tap & die set like that, but it would be nice to be able to thread 1 1/2" brass tube for making a home made lens or lens ring, etc.
    with special tools, on a lathe.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #10
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Large diameter threads are generally cut on a lathe with a single point tool. I have also seen them cut with a tool called a thread chaser which is like a chisel but with the end profile with maybe 10 v grooves with the thread profile. Takes a reallly good machinist to hand cut threads on a lathe with one.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

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