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  1. #11
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Just curious why you think the Deardorff isn't a good camera for wide lenses... I regularly use it down to 90mm without a recessed lensboard and have used a 47mm on mine with a recessed lensboard.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  2. #12

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    I'm a MF photographer, almost totaly, and I use a small 2x3 view camera when I need more control.

    When I have thoughts about working in LF I think of 5x7 as the best jump from 2x3. 4x5 jump from 2x3 seems to be more like a 6x4.5cm jump from 35mm - although the difference in quality is noticeable, I prefer something more extraordinary - therefore, it's 5x7 or larger for my satisfaction (w/o enlargement).
    My 2 cents.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  3. #13
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    "My first thoughts are why 5x7. Modern 5x4 film is so good if you enlarging, and you also shoot 10x8 why bother"

    The reasons for 5x7 over 4x5 have to do more with aspect ratio, and size of contact prints than with film quality. 5x7 contact prints are a wonderful size for viewing at reading distance. They also don't require such a large mat and frame when on the wall. The greater length to width of the image makes them more pleasing to many people.

    I own and use just about every size of sheet film camera from 2 1/4x 3 1/4 to 7x17. My favorite is 5x7 and it accounts for 75-80% of all my images.

    As an aside, I also sell more 5x7 prints than all other sizes combined. Something about easier to display on the average living room wall.
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    "My first thoughts are why 5x7. Modern 5x4 film is so good if you enlarging, and you also shoot 10x8 why bother"

    The reasons for 5x7 over 4x5 have to do more with aspect ratio, and size of contact prints than with film quality. 5x7 contact prints are a wonderful size for viewing at reading distance. They also don't require such a large mat and frame when on the wall. The greater length to width of the image makes them more pleasing to many people.

    I own and use just about every size of sheet film camera from 2 1/4x 3 1/4 to 7x17. My favorite is 5x7 and it accounts for 75-80% of all my images.

    As an aside, I also sell more 5x7 prints than all other sizes combined. Something about easier to display on the average living room wall.


    I'm curious, how does your 5x7 camera compare in weight to the RB67 (6-8LBS) less tripod?
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    The Canham wood field weighs the same as the RB67. Body only is 6 lbs, add in anywhere from .5-2.0 lbs for the lens.

  6. #16
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    Panastasia, regarding rb67 weight versus 4x5 or 5x7 LF, I think weight is kind of moot for me because the times that I take the rb out for field stuff is when it is windy and I have to leave the large-bellows cameras at home!

    The rb lenses are, of course, much heavier than the comparable LF lenses. So, I find that a typical LF kit with three lenses comes out way lighter than would an rb with three! But, boy, sometimes the rb is the only thing I'd use. Windy weather, low light... rapid shooting on roll film, or sheet for that matter.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #17

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    There's no one format that i favor over another. I pick the camera to fit the need. 35mm to 8x10, whatever works for what I'm doing. Personally my feeling is I use the largest neg and slowest film, within reason, that I can use under the particular conditions I'm shooting under. Weather, people and light are certainly factors and now that I'm almost 60 weight and distance I carry it is too.

    Thanks for all of your thoughts. I've about settled on the Canham 5x7 wood.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Dudenbostel View Post
    ....now that I'm almost 60 weight and distance I carry it is (a factor) too....

    Thanks for all of your thoughts. I've about settled on the Canham 5x7 wood.
    I hear that!
    Me too!

    The camera sounds interesting, I'll need to consider one, also.

    "The Flying Camera", thanks for the weight comparison.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  9. #19

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    Wanted to say thanks again. I finally settled on the Canham and found a deal on a used one. I debated springing for the Ebony or getting another 4x5 special Deardorff. Just before i was going to order the Deardorff i checked eeeebay and found a real deal. It's a minty Canham wood with a 4x5 and 5x7 back plus a bag bellows and 2 boards. It also has the GG protectors for both and a bunch of 4x5 and 5x7 holders. Didn't need the holders but the price was right. I picked it up for $2200 which I thougt was a very good price.

    One other factor that influenced me was the ability to use the 6x17 roll back. I'll probably pick one up later this year. Also the ability to interchange to 4x10 and 5x12. Probably won't go 5x12 but the 4x10 is attractive.

    Thanks for your help!

  10. #20

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    You won't be sorry. I've been using a Canham 57/45 Wood for over ten years. I find it solid and rigid. I generally refer to it as a metal camera in a wooden box.

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