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  1. #11

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    Embrace your single coated lens, for has Jim wrote it will help with shadow detail. Uncoated lenses used judiciously are capable of wonderful luminosity. A good friend who had some wonderful Leica lenses would often favour the single/uncoated versions for this very reason.

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    Unfortunately, the only way to increase image contrast is through development or film choice.
    Not strictly true you can help enormously by using a good tight lens hood, the difference can be quite surprising.

    While you're not actually increasing the optical contrast of the lens you are stopping extraneous light from entering the system cutting internal flare, to a minimum. Ideally a rectangular shaped hood, rather than the circular.

    Ian

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser View Post
    As the title implies does the use of a multi coated filter compensate at all for the lower contrast of single coated lenses? ordinarily I would test this, and at some point I will, but right now the weather does not allow.
    It seems to me that there may be some benefit if the filter filters out a component of the light that includes a lot of flare.

    I know that sounds confusing, but if I can provide a possible example:

    If the ambient light is quite yellow, and the lens is likely to flare in the yellow part of the spectrum, a blue filter would block a portion of the spectrum, including that yellow portion of the light that contributes so much to the flare.

    Does this make sense?

    Matt

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor Crone View Post
    Embrace your single coated lens, for has Jim wrote it will help with shadow detail. Uncoated lenses used judiciously are capable of wonderful luminosity. A good friend who had some wonderful Leica lenses would often favour the single/uncoated versions for this very reason.
    I'm in favor of multicoated lenses for brightly lit subjects, like sunny landscapes. I sometimes use a single coated 65mm f/8 Super Angulon and can see fuzzy highlights (flair) in my prints. Not so with my multicoated 150mm f/5.6 Symmar S.

    If this observation relates to differences in "luminosity" between one lens and another, I'd rather not have unintentional flair. For intentional fuzzy specular highlights in glass, or metallic objects, it can be a benefit, though.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harrigan View Post
    No they do not.
    He said in his second post that he wants to cut down on stray light---a hood is the best way to cut down on stray light!!!

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by panastasia View Post
    I'm in favor of multicoated lenses for brightly lit subjects, like sunny landscapes. I sometimes use a single coated 65mm f/8 Super Angulon and can see fuzzy highlights (flair) in my prints. Not so with my multicoated 150mm f/5.6 Symmar S.

    If this observation relates to differences in "luminosity" between one lens and another, I'd rather not have unintentional flair. For intentional fuzzy specular highlights in glass, or metallic objects, it can be a benefit, though.
    Like most the majority of my photography is with modern MC lenses. However I do have a couple of oldies that are single or uncoated and I do occasionally use these on overcast days to achieve a soft, quite luminous, almost 'orthochromatic' look. Bearing in mind that I only shot b/w. I also achieve a similar 'look' when using my MC lenses by again shooting on overcast days, over exposing and cutting back the film development. I've then got the flexibility to expand or contract the tonality even further at the printing stage.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor Crone View Post
    Like most the majority of my photography is with modern MC lenses. However I do have a couple of oldies that are single or uncoated and I do occasionally use these on overcast days to achieve a soft, quite luminous, almost 'orthochromatic' look. Bearing in mind that I only shot b/w. I also achieve a similar 'look' when using my MC lenses by again shooting on overcast days, over exposing and cutting back the film development. I've then got the flexibility to expand or contract the tonality even further at the printing stage.


    Trevor,

    Overcast days were never a problem for me - my single coated lens is a gem!

    I only shoot B&W now and your methods are similar to mine, but I usually don't underdevelop for lower contrast scenes - in order to maintain luminosity in the print - maybe we're both looking at different aspects of tonality, or contrast range (mid tone manipulation, that is). It sounds like your MC lenses give you more contrast than you desire sometimes. By "orthochromatic look", I assume your talking about cloudless skies.

    Regards,
    Paul
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by panastasia View Post
    By "orthochromatic look", I assume your talking about cloudless skies.

    Regards,
    Paul
    Hi Paul,

    White skies or very pale grey (in the print) and 'open' detailed shadow areas.

    I do find modern lenses can at times be a little too contrasty for my tastes.

    I just adore overcast days and there's plenty of opportunity for them here in the UK

    Regards,
    Trevor.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by 23mjm View Post
    He said in his second post that he wants to cut down on stray light---a hood is the best way to cut down on stray light!!!
    Yes of course a lens hood is but ER already knows that. My comment was based on his question about mc filters not a response to yours about a lens hood. However I'm happy to provide a beating post for you if that outburst made you feel better. :-)

  10. #20
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    A single coated lens blocks out a specific wave lenght, right? Then to filter out other light might give more contrast.
    /matti

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