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  1. #1

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    Do multi coated filters compensate for single coated lenses?

    As the title implies does the use of a multi coated filter compensate at all for the lower contrast of single coated lenses? ordinarily I would test this, and at some point I will, but right now the weather does not allow.

  2. #2
    23mjm's Avatar
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    I would say NO-----because the internals elements still produce the reflections that cause the loss of contrast.

  3. #3

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    I was thinking it might help because it might cut down on stray light entering the lens which then bounces around hither and thither.

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    23mjm's Avatar
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    I think a good lens hood would be a better way of achieving this!!! Personally I love lens hoods!!

  5. #5

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    No they do not.

  6. #6
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    No. After all, most internal flare is not caused by stray light, but by light reflected from the subject, so anything you put in front of the lens increases flare, less so if it is multicoated.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7

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    I know that there is flare even between lens groups and lens elements that have air surfaces, however even with a lens shade that is masked to the exact proportion of the image, and is at the borders of the image, there is still a certain amount of off axis light entering the lens. Wouldn't an MC filter cut down some of this light, and therefore reduce some of the flare?

  8. #8

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    Multi-coating allows greater light transmission.

    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser View Post
    I know that there is flare even between lens groups and lens elements that have air surfaces, however even with a lens shade that is masked to the exact proportion of the image, and is at the borders of the image, there is still a certain amount of off axis light entering the lens. Wouldn't an MC filter cut down some of this light, and therefore reduce some of the flare?
    Uncoated and single-coated lenses suffer from more "veiling glare" than do multi-coated lenses. This glare acts as a veil, obscuring low-contrast details. Other posters have explained exactly what causes this - light ricocheting between various elements - and even inside the glass lens elements themselves. A single-element lens thus benefits from multicoating, too.

    If the lens is multi-coated, more of the light goes right on through - to the film. Thus, there is less light reflecting and refracting back and forth between various air-to-glass surfaces. Even cemented glass surfaces will create some [but very little] of this stray - or uncontrolled - light, bouncing around.

    Multicoating a filter accomplishes two things: {one} more light goes through to the next glass surface, and eventually to the film. {two} because there is less light lost at the surfaces, there is less light bouncing back and forth between the front and back of the filter's glass surfaces. Eventually, this bouncing light exits the glass, and it doesn't go in the same direction as the light that originated from the subject. Thus, it "veils" the image on the film by landing where this light should not be.

    A multicoated filter will perform better than a less-well coated filter. No filter will reduce the veiling glare inherent in the lens. Also, every multicoated filter will introduce more veiling glare than using no filter.

    In old movies [and photos] you will see huge reflections off eyeglass lenses. Often the person's eyes are not visible at all. There were no coatings then. Now, eyeglass lenses are nearly invisible as very little light reflects off the front, or back surfaces.

    In the film "Good Night and Good Luck", I suspect the eyeglass lenses were purposely uncoated, to give that "period" look.

    Multicoating allows about 99.5% transmission at each air-to-glass surface. Uncoated glass transmits about 96%.
    Last edited by Larry.Manuel; 02-22-2008 at 11:07 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling error

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the comments. I was hoping that there might be some means of upping the image contrast of a recently purchased single coated lens. I didn't think the use of a MC filter would be a solution but as I never tested for this I was hoping that it could be.

  10. #10
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, the only way to increase image contrast is through development or film choice.

    Low contrast can work to your advantage occasionally. Shadow detail can often be better with poorly coated, or uncoated, lenses because the reflections effectively prefog the film. I've seen some example photographs where a much punchier multicoated lens had minimal shadow detail in a specific scene but an uncoated lens showed significant detail. It was interesting.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

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