Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,303   Posts: 1,681,534   Online: 725
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    84
    On Graflex reliability, I'm very happy with my 60 year old Speed. It's FP shutter works fine, as do many other's I've looked at. I can't say the same for a lot of 1950s 35mm cloth shutter material. The Kalart RF works fine and is adjustable by the user. Everything about the cameras seems to last.

    They don't have a lot of features, but are good for basic 4x5 work. I think you would be fine with a Crown, with a kalart, and use shutter lenses.

    Graflex cameras were robust and popular with the press in the 20s-60s, and now with photogs in the next century. If they were not good, they wouldn't remain so popular through the generations.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    17
    I enjoy having the focal plane shutter (which was the reason I picked up the camera to begin with!) It seems reasonably accurate, I've used it from 1/15th all the way to 1/1000th, and the negatives appear to be what I would expect them to be. I use the speed for barrel lenses, and other lens experiments, I love it! Wish I could get something like that on my 8x10 haha!

    I've thought about making a frankenstein, taking the back of a speed graphic, remove the ground glass, and secure it just behind the front standard of an 8x10, and then I'd have an adjustable shutter for any lens on the 8x10! I'm not sure how my exposures would be though, I'd probably need to figure out a new graph of shutter tension and shutter widths.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    10
    Start with the Crown: it's important to get started with every advantage (it's much lighter). Then you'll be getting a Speed too so you can play around with funky barrel lenses (like Xenotars or Aero Ektars or pawn shop stuff from the Civil War ...). Then you'll be getting a roll-back ...

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    easter NY, 2 miles so. of Canadian border
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    100
    I have used speed graphics for over 60 years, and have never had a problem with the shutters other than loose screws. Like every other hand held camera, you have to get used to it. I think the speed is faster to use for "grab shots" than my b&j speed press, but the b&j has much more front standard movements. The speed graphic view finder works just as well vertically as horizontally. In the newspaper game, we called verticals "elbow shots", an easy technique to learn once you get the camera and play with it a little.

  5. #25
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,009
    I use the FP shutter on my speed graphic constantly. I trust it at least as much as in-lens shutters. And it goes to 1000!
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #26
    jnanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    18,290
    Blog Entries
    15
    Images
    77
    speeds are great cameras,
    the FP shutters are great as well.
    ( graflex cameras had them for 60+ years )
    i'd pick a speed over a crown any day of the week.
    how else can you use a lens harvested off
    of a junque folder or a magnifying glass lens or a ... ?

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    300
    I had a crown and switched to a Busch Pressman D for the revolving back, better rangefinder compared with the crown (side RF), and seemingly more precise and durable construction.

  8. #28
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    I have a 2x3 speed and a 4x5 crown.

    I am looking for a 4x5 speed specifically to get the FP shutter. The crown top RF is light and fast, but I still want an FP shutter sometimes.

    I will not be ditching the crown when I find the speed I want.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    125
    I prefer the side-mounted rangefinder, as they're easy to calibrate for any lens (see instructions at graflex.org). The top mounted requires cams, which may be hard to find a good match for your choice of lens.

    Make sure you get one with a graflok back, not the spring back, that way you can add a roll film back if you should choose. Most, if not all, crowns came with the graflok back, but only the newer speed graphics had them.

    Lens boards are easy to come by on ebay... someone was selling brand-new remanufactured boards a while back for cheap, but I don't see any of those online right now.

  10. #30
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,167
    Images
    1
    I presently own both a very nice Speed Graphic and a Crown and while I like them both, the Crown gets used about a hundred times more than the speed. In fact, the Crown is easily my most often used, non 35mm camera. I only shoot the Crown Graphic hand held. If I want/need to a tripod, or movements I'll haul out a more appropriate camera for that activity. Yes, you can accomplish most movements with a crown or speed but, it is a hassle and just not fun. If you want to shoot hand held, get a Crown or Speed - it really doesn't matter which they're both great. If you want to use movements get something else and forget about hand held.

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - hand-holdable 4x5 environmental portraiture and documentary, industrial, landscape... etc.
    The crown and speed were designed for hand help work. It is how these cameras were meant to be used. They excel at it. I can and very very often do hand hold the crown at 1/50th of a second shutter speed. No problem There are several examples in my flickr stream follow link in signature).

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - I don't really need many movements. I would like some tilt and or swing though to create a dreamy look.
    Movements? Dreamy look? Forget that gimmicky shit. If your shooting hand held, just focus and shoot. Documentary, environmental portraiture...these are not "dreamy".

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - I'm not going to be using a flash.
    Me either - cannot afford flash bubs. But the flash handle is very...well, handy.

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - Basically I want a 4x5 point and shoot rangefinder.
    Get a crown graphic with a well adjusted rangefinder and be happy.

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - I have a Fujinon W 135/5.6 lens. Could I get a graphic and use this lens on it? Advantages? disadvantages?
    Yeah, you could...I guess...but, I see no real advantage. The stock optar and Xenar are fantastic. The 127mm Kodak Ektar is even better!


    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - Do either cameras have a revolving back?
    No...There is no need for a revolving back. Does your 35mm SLR have a revolving back? Hand held...you wanna shoot portrait, hold the camera on its side!

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - Which camera or model has the best rangefinder?
    They have the same rangefinder.

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - Which one is more suitable for hand-held photography?
    I give a slight edge to the Crown - not only because it is lighter but because they are simpler. Shooting hand held is all about being ready and acting fast. The focal plane shutter adds complexity that can slow you down - especially while you're learning. It is one more thing that you have to think about - or can be. Starting out you do not need this added complexity.

    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    - Would there be advantages to having a focal plane shutter?
    You can shoot with any old lens you find laying on the side walk. Just hot melt glue it to an scrap of card stock of appropriate dimensions and you're good to go (sounds like I'm kidding. I am not - I've done this with ratty old enlarger lenses that I bought five for ten bucks - and gotten surprisingly good results).
    Last edited by BradS; 11-11-2010 at 01:29 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typos.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin