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  1. #11
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    This is great info! What would be a great camera for traveling on a bike?
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  2. #12
    keithwms's Avatar
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    You want a biking 4x5? For landscapey stuff?

    For that I would definitely deploy my crown graphic. With the 127mm or 150 Schneider convertible folded up inside, it's like a tidy little lunchbox. If you bite the dust on your bike or drop it, you truly won't care.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #13
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Architecture is the filter as landscapes and cityscapes are les demanding. You'll need movements (mostly rise) and a camera that can take short lenses. I'd skip the heavy Calumet's and graphic views and get an Sinar F1 or 2 or a Arca Swiss F-line. I'd also get a shorter lens 90-110 and a 6x9 or 6x7 roll film holder. The shorter lens will allow exteriors of buildings that are two stories or higher and the roll film holder will allow you to turn the wide angle lens into a normal lens. The problem with old heavy mono rails are that they are old, heavy, and a PIA. If you learn to love LF, in spite of the camera, you'll want to upgrade. If you buy the better camera now you are more likely to fall in love and less likely to have to upgrade as soon. The Sinars and Arcas hold their value better.

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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Brummitt View Post
    This is great info! What would be a great camera for traveling on a bike?
    The one you enjoy shooting!

  5. #15
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Beginners, and many others, should be aware that a Graphic is not a field camera or a view camera. It is not even good for a general scenic if maximum DOF is desired because it does not have any front tilt, probably the most utilized movement. Many can be altered to provide this movement,but they are no inherent.
    The Speeds and Crowns do have front tilt. With the bed flat, it is a rearward tilt, and with the bed dropped, it is a forward tilt..and more than enough for pretty much any scenario outdoors. They also have a vertical shift.

    Additionally, any camera where you can directly view what will be the film plane on a ground glass is a "view camera". They are definitely "view cameras". View cameras include monorail cameras, flatbed studio cameras, field cameras, and press cameras. Even the Mamiya Press system are view cameras when outfitted with the ground glass back.

    Graphic Views, which I suggested, are full-on monorail cameras with all movements.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 10-01-2008 at 08:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    They do have front tilt. With the bed flat, it is a rearward tilt, and with the bed dropped, it is a forward tilt..and more than enough for pretty much any scenario outdoors. They also have a vertical shift.

    Additionally, any camera where you can directly view what will be the film plane on a ground glass is a "view camera". They are definitely "view cameras". View cameras include monorail cameras, flatbed studio cameras, field cameras, and press cameras. Even the Mamiya Press system are view cameras when outfitted with the ground glass back.

    Graphic Views, which I suggested, are full-on monorail cameras with all movements.
    2F/2F
    i think he thought we were talking about the press cameras, not teh view cameras.
    i wish i still had my graphic view II it was a a great camera, and when i had my tripod extended all the way UP i could stand on the fiber box to focus!
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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    The Speeds and Crowns do have front tilt. With the bed flat, it is a rearward tilt, and with the bed dropped, it is a forward tilt..and more than enough for pretty much any scenario outdoors. They also have a vertical shift.

    Additionally, any camera where you can directly view what will be the film plane on a ground glass is a "view camera". They are definitely "view cameras". View cameras include monorail cameras, flatbed studio cameras, field cameras, and press cameras. Even the Mamiya Press system are view cameras when outfitted with the ground glass back.

    Graphic Views, which I suggested, are full-on monorail cameras with all movements.
    You are correct about the movements with the speed graphic.

  8. #18

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    I really like the Graphic Views. The Graphic View II has AXIS tilt, as the Graphic View I has base tilt and that is only difference. The backs, lens boards are interchangeable between the I and II (4 inch square lens boards). The later Graphic View II's do not come with a pan head just a mounting block.
    It's not the camera......

  9. #19
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    What about the 2 1/4 x 31/4 graphics? They have roll film backs but do they offer movements as well?
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  10. #20
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    To get back to the question:

    The best I can do in checking out Sydney is
    (hardly a field camera, but not impossible. Make sure the bellows ore OK)

    Otherwise KEH in Atlanta, always reliable:

    http://www.cameras.net.au/secondhand.php

    Toyo 4x5 G View Camera c/w 58mm Grandagon Lens #5708522, Standard and Wide Angle Bellows, Extension Rail, Compendium/Bellows Lenshade, several Lenspanels, 6x9cm Rollfilm Holder, 6x7cm Adapter, Polaroid 545 back and 4x5 inch Cutfilm Holders x6 - (Very Good) $795

    Regards - Ross

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