Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,901   Posts: 1,555,805   Online: 812
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    810
    Images
    70
    I have never met a Fujinon lens that I didnt like. It took me over three years, but I finally was able to put together a virtually complete collection of all Fujinon lenses. The only one I am missing is the very very eluasive 300mm SW, of which I have seen exactly only one.(It was priced way to much.)

    They along with Nikon and any of the modern makers are all fine lenses. On film, for the most part you will have a very hard time telling the difference.

    Gary
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for hours.
    Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

    Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    119
    I recently acquired the Fujinon A (180mm and 240mm) and C (300mm, 450mm and 600mm) lenses.

    Those Fujinons are small, light, very sharp, contrasty, and easily fit into a backpack. They are a pleasure to handle in the field. However, they have slow max aperatures and that can be a problem (for me) in lower light situations. Nevertheless, they are fantastic.

    The Nikkor-W 210mm is a great, bright lens and can usually be purchased in the $300-375US range. Personally, I'd get the Fujinon-A 240mm lens, currently new for $795 at badgergraphic.com. As Allen mentioned in his post, it will cover an 8x10 (although barely). The Nikkor-W 210mm will only cover a 5x7.

  3. #13
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    Here is some info on Fujinon lenses:

    http://web.archive.org/web/200612051...om/subgallery/
    Jerold Harter MD

  4. #14
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    Guys, thank you all very much

    I greatly appreciate the data, personal anecdotes and the good plain common sense advice

    APUG is just such a tremendous resource for anything photographic of almost and vintage.

    Left to my own devices to search the internet, I would never have found half this stuff in a month of Sundays

    Martin

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Aislabie View Post
    In Europe our standard LF Lenses are almost exclusively Rodenstock and Schneider products.

    However, we can get Fujinon lenses (rare) and Nikons (v rare)

    However, there is almost no information available about them.

    I understand that they are more common in other parts of the world.

    I am looking primarily at a 210mm 75deg (ish) Lens – either brand new or very recent

    How do the Fuji and Nikon Lenses compare to the Schneider and Rodenstock products for sharpness, contrast, coverage, flare and how well do they age – all relative to one another?

    I assume the Fujinons are still in production

    Are the Nikons still being manufactured?

    There is a considerable price difference between the European and Japanese products – which is too large to put down just to Yen:Euro exchange rates.

    Thanks for the help

    Martin
    I have a copy of the Nikon Product Guide from 1994/5 which has full specs for Nikon LF lenses.

    Be aware that these lenses came in 3 series, the M series with an angle of coverage at f22 of approx. 55 degrees (variation of a couple of degrees from size to size), the W series with approx. 70 degrees and the SW series with 105 ( and also a T telephoto series and an AM macro series).

    Nikon LF lenses were freely avaialble from Robert White before they were discontinued. As I recall, they were slightly cheaper than German lenses. I have 135 W and 65 and 90 SW. In terms of quality, all the Nikons I have used do what the spec says, flare suppression is very good, contrast seems medium like almost all modern LF lenses, can't say anything about ageing because none of my lenses is very old. The Nikkor W 210 f5.6, 70 degree coverage, image circle at f22/infinity 295 mm, would suit your requirements, it came in a #1 shutter.

  6. #16
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413

    aerial resolution

    Guys, when reading through this vast amount of stuff I was directed to (thanks everyone) I came across an expression I didn't realy understand - aerial resolution.

    What is aerial resolution

    Many thanks

    Martin

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    IIRC it's the resolution the lens puts onto the image cast.

    If you test it with film you've got the resolution that is the result of the lens and the film. The aerial would be looking with a loupe at the groundglass.

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    Nick, thanks

    It makes sense

    Martin

  9. #19
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    IIRC it's the resolution the lens puts onto the image cast.

    If you test it with film you've got the resolution that is the result of the lens and the film. The aerial would be looking with a loupe at the groundglass.
    Correct apart from the last sentence. Inspecting the aerial image is not done with a groundglass, it's done with an optic. The aerial image is in the air, not on a surface. A telescope eyepiece typically focuses on the aerial imagefrom the main lens (aka objective). The aerial image takes the focusing surface or film out of the resolution equation and tells you just how good the image produced by the lens alone is. You can use a short focal length optic to inspect the aerial image to reach the resolution limit of the lens under test. You can take the groundglass off your view camera and inspect the aerial image with a loupe or other lens. Doing this handheld is possible, but to get down to the limits of the main lens and keep the planes of focus coincident, you'll need a way to hold the inspection lens square to the main lens, typically done with an "optical bench".

    Lee

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Aalen, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    592
    Martin,

    I have only one Fujinon lens - the CM-W 125/5.6 and it is definitely my sharpest lens. The CM-W are the last generation of the Fujinon f/5.6 quasi plasmat lenses. I also lust after the CM-W 210/5.6 but have seen only 1 used over the last year and to buy new is a bit too much for me.

    For some reason these lenses are not so well know than the Fujinon A and C lenses. Probably because there are in the same class of f/5.6 with Symmar & Sironar lenses from Rodenstock and Schneider. There are few places where you can get these lenses new both in US and Europe. You can also contact the mpex or badgergraphic as they sometimes have these used and/or may try to locate one for you.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin