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  1. #11
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    I noticed it comes in several widths. Having never done any bellows work, which would be a better width from most bellows repair/reinforcement?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    I noticed it comes in several widths. Having never done any bellows work, which would be a better width from most bellows repair/reinforcement?
    Sandy's original post in the previous thread suggested 2-3". I guess it depends on the size of the weakened area. In my case, the wear is directly on the corners, so 2" will probably be fine.

    Nathan

  3. #13
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    I fixed one set with several bad holes in the corners with black gaffer tape. It worked well and has held up for several years but added extra thickness to the bellows so they don't compress as flat as they used to.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  4. #14
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    You could try using patches made from Golden Heavy Body Black (or suitable red) acrylic and a Japanese paper, made from 90-100% kozo or gampi fiber, such as a Gampi tissue, Hosho or Kitakata. Avoid more than 10% sulphite in these papers.

    The Golden acrylic paints are top quality and the acrylic binder acts an adhesive, though you could also buy a small jar or bottle of one of their many gel or liquid mediums as added insurance; most are very good glues and used by artists as such. Emailing Golden for their advice might be good, they have great product support and may have experience with this topic.

    The Japanese papers are made from long fibers, longer even than flax, in overlapping layers that run at cross directions and are very durable; they are often used for mending books, which can put them through a lot of stressing, perhaps more so than a bellows.

    Paint them on the bellows side with the paint and dab a little over the bellows area where it'll go, lay-on the patch and when dry, about 30 min or so, give a light overcoat of paint/medium, or repeat with a slightly larger patch and then a finishing coat.

    Any decent art supply house will carry these papers and brand paint so you shouldn't have too much trouble finding them. If you can't locate the paper, PM me and I'll shoot you some odd pieces you can use as patches.

    Cheers

  5. #15

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    Thanks Eli, very interesting idea. I like it.
    Nathan

  6. #16

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    liquid electrical tape

    for fixing pin holes could you also use liquid electrical tape? from what I've read it is fast drying and comes in red and black

  7. #17

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    fixing bellow pinholes with acrylic nail polish?

    I read online of using wet 'n' wild nail polish color black creme to fill in pin holes in the bellows of an agfa isolette. Does anyone have any success with this method? To me it wouldn't seem to work well because nail polish is meant to be hard and brittle, whereas the bellows are meant to be flexible. Therefore, I wouldn't think this would even be a good short term solution. Any ideas?

  8. #18

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    Used liquid electrical tape on my deardorff. Seem to work well, do it in layers.

  9. #19

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    how durable is the repair

    With the liquid electrical tape, how long does the repair last?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mongo6407 View Post
    With the liquid electrical tape, how long does the repair last?
    I've got one that's been over a year now, but the camera doesn't see much use. No more than one roll a month if that. It's still flexible and light tight, and a lot cheaper than a replacement bellows.

    If you want something for hard use that must be dependable in the face of financial loss to a customer, then I wouldn't use the liquid electrical tape. But for a hobby camera that I use occasionally I'm pretty satisfied with the results so far, and it's pretty cheap.

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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