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  1. #11
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeytumble View Post
    You bring up a very good point. By sheer luck, I have a Technica to Sinar lens-board adapter made by S. K. Grimes. I friend purchased it for me. The thing looks brand new and he paid next to nothing for it (he picked out of a left over parts bin). So, something that would accept a Technica lens-board might be an obvious criteria.
    Chamonix 4x5. Also takes Technica boards. Under $1000. Lightweight. Can be used for portraiture, close-ups, and landscape. Very rigid for field use.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  2. #12

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    Lots different

    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    You should look into a Graflex Pacemaker 4x5. It's technically a "press camera" and not a "Field camera" but the only difference I'm aware of is that in a "field camera" the film plane is tiltable while it is fixed in a press camera.

    They are very tough, and not too heavy.
    A Pacemaker Speed Graphic is a lot more different than that. Enough different that after using my Speed Graphic for awhile, I bought a proper field camera. I'm keeping the Speed Graphic because it does one very special thing that the field camera doesn't do: it has a focal plane shutter for my very special barrel lens. It also accepts Graflok back accesories that my field camera won't accept. Most field cameras have Graflok backs. I guess Fred Picker didn't need such accesories.

  3. #13

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    The best solution would seem to be one of the folding field cameras that take Linhof technika boards, plus an adapter to use those boards on your Sinar. Otherwise build up dedicated sets of lenses for both cameras! That would at least widen your choice of field camera.

    For instance, do you want wood, metal or plastic for your camera body? How much weight are you prepared to carry?

  4. #14
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    I have had the same setup as you - and problem.

    The Sinar P is just a beauty in studio, but these 20 steps away from car made me purchase a Linhof Technika V.

    The Technika boards will now fit my Sinar adapterboard, but i use this adapter very seldom, since i have bought some really nice and huge portraitlenses for the Sinar which will not fit the Technika, and the lenses which I use for the Technika is primarely for landscape.

    But I recommend this setup - not cheap, but not the most expensive either

  5. #15

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    Well, I think that if you want to make longer hikes, than you really want a lightweight camera like Tachihara (I have one) or Chamonix or similar - weight bellow 4 pounds. If you are also more serious about macro or similar, than you would probably prefer a camera with rear standard focusing. Maybe a Technikardan TK45S or Arca Swiss Field F Compact (with 6x9 front standard) could be a solution. Both of these are about 6 - 7 pounds. Not as light as a field camera, but much lighter than you Sinar P (around 12- 14 pounds I guess). There is also a very interesting Toyo VX125, but is limited by the bellows draw to 300mm (non tele design) lenses. On the other hand it does not need a bag bellows.

    I am in opposite situation - having a Tachi and looking for a relatively light weight "field" monorail. Sinar F is definitely the cheapest option but also the heaviest and most bulky to backpack.

  6. #16

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    I have a Sinar P2 and F2 that I use for most of my needs, eg studio, very long lens, very short lens, near car, macro, and so on. For backpacking I have the Toho with these lenses in Toho mount, Schneider, 80mm, 110mm, and 150mm, as well as Fuji 240mm and 450mm. I have had SK Grimes make up a Toho to Sinar adapter board, so I do not have to change any lens boards when changing cameras.
    Now I feel I have the best of both worlds. A Toho for backpacking, and the Sinar for everything else. Works for me!
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  7. #17
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    You might look into the old pocos. I have a 5x7 and an 8x10 poco. They both came with quite nice convertible Bausch & Lomb lenses (with bulb activated shutters), and the are *extremely* lightweight. People cannot believe how light they are. They go for $200 or so on the bay and will require bellows patching, but that's about it.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've settled on the same setup, more or less, as Blue Lemon--8x10" Sinar P at home (with 4x5 reducing back and sliding back), 4x5" Technika V out and about, and Sinar-Technika adapter boards for most of my lenses. The big portrait lenses that don't fit on a Technika board go on Sinar boards, since I'm not usually carrying those around anyway. I've got other large format cameras as well, but I've got most of them using Sinar lensboards. I've still got to convert my 7x17" Korona to Sinar lensboards, which I'll probably do when I have the bellows out for replacement.
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  9. #19

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    A crown graphic does so many things a Sinar P does not do, it is a great second camera. Now you just have to figure out what the 3rd camera will be. Lots of good suggestions here.

  10. #20
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    I prefer to stay within a system. However, if you do look outside the Sinar system, the Horsaman FA is a nice lightweight, small 4x5 field camera. There are a lot of things it does not do (so that it can be small and light) but you probably don't need 2 cameras that both do the same things.

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