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  1. #11
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    What Ian said.

    If you can't see why you would use it after taking the class, by all means don't use it! It is great for some things and some shooters, and horrible for others. Don't waste your effort using something "just because", and don't let anyone tell you you've gotta do this or do that. There are no bragging rights based on format. Only your final product. I have so much crap that I unnecessarily shot on large format when I was first learning it. I went through a period where I shot large format "just because" I thought it was fun, and the sharpness just killed me coming straight in as a beginning student with just six weeks of photography experience on 35. I'd take a Speed Graphic out as an everyday walk around camera "just because" I loved the process of it so darned much. I learned a lot about photography, and it improved my shooting across the board, but I also missed a bunch of stuff I would have got with roll film, and I really don't have a ton of images that I love to death from it all (and the ones that I do love would have been 90% as good on medium format). I *did* have a sizable hole in my wallet at that time, however, and no time for ANYTHING else! Now I have negs that are overkill in terms of technical quality, I missed shooting some things that I would have loved to have instead, and I have a bunch of film that won't fit in my current enlarger.

    If I want to devote a lot of time to actually *crafting* a photograph, and I don't need to shoot a whole ton, I like large format because of the control, versatility, and quality.

    Avedon shot 6x6 as well...a LOT. My favorite of his work was done with a TLR.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 01-11-2009 at 03:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  2. #12
    papagene's Avatar
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    Check out Arnold Newman. He also shot with many different formats.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    What Ian said.

    If you can't see why you would use it after taking the class, by all means don't use it! It is great for some things and some shooters, and horrible for others. Don't waste your effort using something "just because", and don't let anyone tell you you've gotta do this or do that. There are no bragging rights based on format. Only your final product. I have so much crap that I unnecessarily shot on large format when I was first learning it. I went through a period where I shot large format "just because" I thought it was fun, and the sharpness just killed me coming straight in as a beginning student with just six weeks of photography experience on 35. I'd take a Speed Graphic out as an everyday walk around camera "just because" I loved the process of it so darned much. I learned a lot about photography, and it improved my shooting across the board, but I also missed a bunch of stuff I would have got with roll film, and I really don't have a ton of images that I love to death from it all (and the ones that I do love would have been 90% as good on medium format). I *did* have a sizable hole in my wallet at that time, however, and no time for ANYTHING else! Now I have negs that are overkill in terms of technical quality, I missed shooting some things that I would have loved to have instead, and I have a bunch of film that won't fit in my current enlarger.

    If I want to devote a lot of time to actually *crafting* a photograph, and I don't need to shoot a whole ton, I like large format because of the control, versatility, and quality.

    Avedon shot 6x6 as well...a LOT. My favorite of his work was done with a TLR.
    Dear One. You missed the line about he "has" to do it. College is like that. There are good sides and bad sides to this sort of thing. It makes you expand your vision, it's a real PITB if you are not into it at all. Just ask me about studio shooting. I find noothing more boring in the entire world than placing lamps and getting perspective on a kaluha bottle correct. I did need to do it to get out of school though. You suck it in and do the work.

    as to the OP, practice, practice, practice. See how you can expand your smaller format work vision into an 8x10 paradigm. Avadon is a good place to start, even if that isn't my cuppa tea.

    tim in san jose
    Last edited by k_jupiter; 01-11-2009 at 04:07 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: speling of corse
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  4. #14
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    Dear One. You missed the line about he "has" to do it. College is like that. There are good sides and bad sides to this sort of thing. It makes you expand your vision, it's a real PITB if you are not into it at all. Just ask me about studio shooting. I find noothing more boring in the entire world than placing lamps and getting perspective on a kaluha bottle correct. I did need to do it to get out of school though. You suck it in and do the work.

    as to the OP, practice, practice, practice. See how you can expand your smaller format work vision into an 8x10 paradigm. Avadon is a good place to start, even if that isn't my cuppa tea.

    tim in san jose
    Of course he has to use the camera. What I am suggesting is to find what suits the format, rather then attempting to squeeze his current "work" into it, which can lead to using it unnecessarily, hence expense, frustration, etc. Then, "after the class", as I preempted everything I said with, he knows when to use it and when not, and if it works for him with what he likes to do now. In other words, don't let no stinkin' required class change you "just because" of what people in it say.

    The aesthetic part of my answer was simply to refer the OP to Ian Grant's post; especially his first sentence. I could not add anything much to that! I was just sort of grumbling on the fine art world's large format arrogance that I am constantly running into in classes.

    Maybe the OP can do a nice still life of a turd in a punch bowl and turn that in.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 01-11-2009 at 04:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15
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    The 8x10 will force you to visualize.

    After you make a few exposures just to "see what will develop", you will realize you need to know what the photograph will look like before you take the picture. After you learn to visualize, you will still throw negatives away for all the same reasons you do now, you'll just throw away fewer because you will learn not to take the "bad" ones.

    John

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by aatonpanavision View Post
    I'm mainly a people/advertising style photographer, similar in vein to this kind of stuff:
    http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/7...rrie1231ge.jpg

    however this semester at my college I have to take an LF class and use an 8x10 camera.

    My concern is that 8x10, suits a much different style and aesthetic than I'm used to. And thinking about the ultra sharp clarity of LF it seems you'd have to have a different approach to fashion photography, like it'd be more about the clarity and focus of the image rather than the shapes.
    anyways does anybody have experience or suggestions about fashion shooting on 8x10 - notable photographers? BTW I don't like Dave Lachapelle or Gregory Crewdson style -- so just a heads up.
    thanks
    Hi,
    Perhaps you will allow me to turn the question around? What quality of the image you provide as an illustration would prevent it being taken by a LF camera? The model is static, the camera is static and it looks to me like a strobe was used. How would swapping out the D(whatever) for a D(eardorff) make the image impossible to realize as it is presented? The lack of tonal separation and detail in the shadows and highlights could easily be accomplished in "post processing"

    Remember also that there was a time when LF was the quality standard for high tone publications (a la Vogue) and looking at photo illustrations of couture clothing from the 30's/40's is likely to turn up many example of LF used for fashion.

    However, perhaps I can suggest that you look outside of the immediate field which holds your interest. Two photographers who I think use LF in a way that transcends the generic "LF aesthetic" are Nicholas Nixon and Sally Mann. Both make beautiful photographs of people in which the nature of the camera (and its presence in the immediate space of the photograph) never seems to limit or condition the image. Here are some images for Nixon's best know body of work, and here are some more diverse examples. Here is a link to some info about Sally Mann. Be aware that some consider her controversial (nudity+children), a caveat that brings to mind Jock Sturges. Putting aside any controversy about his work his work, he is a good example of someone who was hired to do commercial campaigns based on a signature style predicated on the use of LF.

    Celac

  7. #17

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    also check out some of frank petronio's portraits
    a lot of it is 4x5, but he was using a 8x10 camera as well ...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  8. #18
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Have a look at the photobiographic book on Steichen, "Lives in Photography." It might give some fresh ideas.

    You might also take the time to research why LF was the choice for this type of photography. I will venture to say that it was not because of greater clarity, and had more to do with overall tonality and ease of duping and touchups. You'll have to find out for yourself what the advantages and disadvantages are today.
    Last edited by keithwms; 01-11-2009 at 06:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #19

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    I find it easier to visualize with a large format camera. Even if it is generally slower, if you learn to anticipate the moment you are looking for.. you can get very close if not spot on. It's actually very rewarding to be able to adapt and 'pull through', using something which initially isn't as user-friendly. At least that's my opinion, i'm horrible at taking pictures of people.

  10. #20
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The style & aesthetic have nothing to do with format.

    What changes is approach, and methodology...
    Approach, and methodology can influence, dictate or inform aesthetic choices. Just as format size and proportion can and influence dictate or inform aesthetic choices.

    learn about the format and camera a bit to see what strikes a cord with you and go from there. I wouldn't be too keen to look what others are doing or have done in an attempt to find some 'style' you could apply.

    But that is just how I see things.

    *

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