Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,702   Posts: 1,548,432   Online: 992
      
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567
Results 61 to 69 of 69
  1. #61
    mjs
    mjs is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkhart, Indiana (USA)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,106
    Images
    2

    Didn't think I was dissing smaller formats?

    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Personally I think the main driver of format should be what you want as a result. One of the problems photographers have, is that they often look for the universal format, but there isn't one. Just like a carpenter may have 5 different saws, the photographer really should have multiple cameras in different formats. They may then have an 8x10 on a big wood tripod, a 4x5 on a smaller tripod or hand held, a 120 roll film camera and a 35mm or digital SLR. They may and probably should switch between those cameras to get what they want for a particular image, rather then limit themselves to what the camera is capable of.

    Yes an 8x10 camera is a wonderful device, I wouldn't want to do a 2 week long kayak ride hauling a 25lb camera and tripod around though, although I would like a relatively lighter folding 4x5 field camera though, using that and a 35mm or DSLR would give you the best of both worlds, use the 4x5 when you have time to set it up and the SLR when you don't. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if some photographers wouldn't simply take a shot with the 4x5 and a DSLR version from the same vantage point to get both.
    You make it sound as though I was advocating '8x10 or bust'. I didn't think I said that; I surely didn't mean anything of that nature. The original point was that a view camera doesn't 'force' a photographer into any particular style: you can have sharp, fuzzy, or anything. They're versatile. And I also specifially said there were some things view cameras don't do well, and gave a couple of examples. Encyclopedic? No, nor encyclopedic in length.

    One thing, though: you said that you wouldn't be surprised to see some folks take a shot with their 4x5 and then the same shot with a DSLR. I've been thinking about that and, for the life of me, can't figure out why I would want to do that. It sounds like a bad solution to not being able to make up one's mind, although I suppose that it's a natural extension of the conceptual need to have cameras in every possible format. After all, if you might need them then I suppose that you really ought to take all of them along with you when you're out photographing. What if you didn't have one and missed something?

    Mike

  2. #62
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by mjs View Post
    You make it sound as though I was advocating '8x10 or bust'. I didn't think I said that; I surely didn't mean anything of that nature. The original point was that a view camera doesn't 'force' a photographer into any particular style: you can have sharp, fuzzy, or anything. They're versatile. And I also specifially said there were some things view cameras don't do well, and gave a couple of examples. Encyclopedic? No, nor encyclopedic in length.

    One thing, though: you said that you wouldn't be surprised to see some folks take a shot with their 4x5 and then the same shot with a DSLR. I've been thinking about that and, for the life of me, can't figure out why I would want to do that. It sounds like a bad solution to not being able to make up one's mind, although I suppose that it's a natural extension of the conceptual need to have cameras in every possible format. After all, if you might need them then I suppose that you really ought to take all of them along with you when you're out photographing. What if you didn't have one and missed something?

    Mike
    Didn't intend that you were dissing other formats, just trying to add some more info to the thread,,,
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  3. #63
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    About the string trick, you can get a small electronic laser rangefinder for about ~$30 from Sonin.

    http://www.opticsplanet.net/sonin-la...ngefinder.html

    I am currently rigging one on a hot shoe to do scale focusing. You don't want to shine the thing in someone's eyes, but.... you get very precise distance measurements from ~2-60 ft , with no strings attached
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #64
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,289
    Images
    148
    Sounds like a good idea I had thought of getting one, but they'll be more expensive here in Turkey :rolleyes:

    Ian

  5. #65
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,325
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    About the string trick, you can get a small electronic laser rangefinder for about ~$30 from Sonin.

    http://www.opticsplanet.net/sonin-la...ngefinder.html

    I am currently rigging one on a hot shoe to do scale focusing. You don't want to shine the thing in someone's eyes, but.... you get very precise distance measurements from ~2-60 ft , with no strings attached
    That's fine for modern lenses, but if you shoot with funky old lenses that have wacky field curvature or diffuse focus, you really have to look at the groundglass to decide where the focus is most aesthetically pleasing, and with field curvature as you have on a Petzval, you can't even measure using a focus scale and a rangefinder or tape measure, because the "focal plane" isn't a plane. In an article on soft focus lenses from the age of soft focus lenses mentioned a while back on the LF forum, several photographers were asked to focus a lens on the same subject, and they each picked different focal points based on aesthetic preference. Julia Margaret Cameron made the same argument in the nineteenth century.

    What the string does is give you a fixed subject distance, and then you can place the focus precisely where you want it based on the groundglass image. You could do the same with the groundglass and a rangefinder, but it wouldn't necessarily involve a focus scale.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #66
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    So, you compose,
    focus on the subject,
    stop down.
    close the shutter,
    cock the shutter,
    load the film,
    pull the slide,
    look at the subject and blast her with a laser ?

    Dude, won't fly in the portrait business.
    I take the string and walk over and ask her to just touch the knot with her cheek,
    and, she's in focus again.

    Shoot. it's about the people, not the gadgets.

  7. #67
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    lol

    Dude, nobody's forcing you to use any gadgets I sometimes like to shoot with wooden boxes too! My two favourite cameras are from 1903!

    Anyway... your proposed workflow is much too laborious. For my purposes it's more like this: Point the camera at a subject, pop the beam quickly on the subject to get the distance, set that distance on the lens, and fire. Waistlevel composition is optional.

    Or simply use the distance meter to decide on optimal DOF settings.

    So... no fine composing through a VF or GG, no stopping down, no close or cocking of shutters, no pulling of slides, and no model getting blasted with a laser! :rolleyes:
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  8. #68

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,547
    Images
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    lol

    Dude, nobody's forcing you to use any gadgets I sometimes like to shoot with wooden boxes too! My two favourite cameras are from 1903!

    Anyway... your proposed workflow is much too laborious. For my purposes it's more like this: Point the camera at a subject, pop the beam quickly on the subject to get the distance, set that distance on the lens, and fire. Waistlevel composition is optional.

    Or simply use the distance meter to decide on optimal DOF settings.

    So... no fine composing through a VF or GG, no stopping down, no close or cocking of shutters, no pulling of slides, and no model getting blasted with a laser! :rolleyes:
    Ya tie your model with a knot to the end of the rope and shoot them with a Taser. Don't y'all know anything?

    tim in san jose

    P.S. a 1903 Taser if you want to be authentic.
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  9. #69

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Westport, MA.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,059
    I was going to make a tongue-in-cheek remark about drugging models but then I remembered that editor from shutterbug, Bob Shell. Oops.
    I mean, that's one way to make sure you get them in focus. They surely won't be moving.. ever.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin