Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,745   Posts: 1,515,635   Online: 880
      
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 69
  1. #1
    aatonpanavision's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    13

    Large Format Aesthetics

    I'm mainly a people/advertising style photographer, similar in vein to this kind of stuff:
    http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/7...rrie1231ge.jpg

    however this semester at my college I have to take an LF class and use an 8x10 camera.

    My concern is that 8x10, suits a much different style and aesthetic than I'm used to. And thinking about the ultra sharp clarity of LF it seems you'd have to have a different approach to fashion photography, like it'd be more about the clarity and focus of the image rather than the shapes.
    anyways does anybody have experience or suggestions about fashion shooting on 8x10 - notable photographers? BTW I don't like Dave Lachapelle or Gregory Crewdson style -- so just a heads up.
    thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    197
    Images
    1
    Avedon.
    Photographs by Richard M. Coda
    my blog
    "Speak softly and carry an 8x10."

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    529
    Images
    133
    You may have look at the recent book of Jim Rakete, "1/8 sec". He's a German photographer, which made the portraits for this book with an 8x10 camera.
    http://www.art-magazin.de/kunst/3393.html
    The text is in German but you may be more interested in the pictures anyway.

    Ulrich

    PS the pictures are of German celebrities mostly

  4. #4
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,256
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by rcoda View Post
    Avedon.
    Yep! First one that came to my mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by aatonpanavision View Post
    My concern is that 8x10, suits a much different style and aesthetic than I'm used to.
    That may be the point. Academic settings often make artists do something they are not used to, or that they do not want to do.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,135
    Images
    20
    You can control the shape of objects in the frame better with a view camera than with a fixed camera, and you can control the plane of focus to make things blurred or sharp, as you choose. A view camera isn't as quick to work with as an SLR, but it gives you options you wouldn't otherwise have. You might also look at the kinds of things people are doing in LF with old and historic lenses for examples of alternatives to the slick look (try a search on "petzval" and "verito" to get started).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    The PROCESS of photography is radically different with 8x10
    than with smaller cameras. It really isn't about sharpness,
    or about film clarity. If anything, it IS about YOUR clarity.

    If anything, 4x5 is about sharpness. 8x10 is all about sweat.

    The pure physicality of using an 8x10
    is what might charge the images you make with a big camera with an emotional intensity
    that is not present with 120. If you have to sweat to make a picture, you are engaged in a radically different way than
    if you just sit back and be intellectual. Of course, you might just choose to impose your 'look' on a big camera,
    and gain nothing from the experience. 8x10 defies irony.

    The only hint is that Edw. Weston worked everyday to be able to set up the rig quickly,
    shoot, and break it all down and move on. Joel Meyerowitz is really fast when he works with 8x10.
    The hard work, the effort, clarifies your vision.

    Ever watch a glassblower work ? Same EXACT thing. Have fun. Be willing to transform yourself.

  7. #7
    aatonpanavision's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    13
    thanks for the thoughts, yeah I don't want to "fight" the camera or impose my look onto something that isn't 35mm like. I learned not to do that when I had a mamiya rb67. I'm super excited to find out where this will take me.

  8. #8
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,001
    Images
    117
    "The hard work, the effort, clarifies your vision."

    and practice until it is second nature where all the options are in the fore front of your mind and easily retrieved. I can't speak to 8x10, but this is pretty much how things work for me.

    Along with Don, David's points seem right on to me.
    LF (the bigger the more true) has some really 'easy' to access abilities -- focus control, dof control, perspective/object shape control and greater ability to render tones.

    *

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    100
    You could start with Nick Knight take a look at Irvin Penn and then glance at Richard Avendon ,Norman Parkinson and Horst in fact most major commercial ,advertising photographers have shot 10/8 as a matter of course ,you might also find that using 10/8 will help develope your ideas and give you an edge over your fellow photographers , I would also suggest you view the project as a positive way to improve your work and not as a negative pain designed to hinder your vision

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,163
    Images
    148
    The style & aesthetic have nothing to do with format.

    What changes is approach, and methodology, a slightly more modern example is david Bailey, he's worked across the formats from 35mm to Large format.

    I guess the other thing that changes is chance versus tight direction, with 35mm and even roll film formats you can shoot a lot of images and hope you get a few good images, but with LF it's about supreme control. That needs a lot of confidence and mastery of technique.

    Ian

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin