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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Hunting around a bit, Hulcher 70mm cameras that can shoot 6x6 or 6x7 were used photographing for rocket launches. They could be enlargements from 70mm using something like a Saunders Proofing Easel, which makes it easy to print four 4x5's on an 8x10" sheet. I use one to print batches of post cards.
    David,

    Thanks for the additional info on 70mm. I have printed many cut frames
    of 70mm which are usually 2-in wide (not including the double perforated
    edges) and cut to 5 inches long. Very sharp and the freeze action between
    frames is stunning especially for rocket ignition sequences. The photo paper
    cannot reproduce the tones in the b&w negative - can't recall the color neg
    tones relationship for printing.

  2. #12
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    Art;

    We used both 5x7 and larger aerial cameras for what looked like (to the eye) to be motion picture footage.

    This looks very similar to that, even to the general edge markings. I would guess that this came from either a 5x7 aerial camera running full speed, or if they had one, a 4x5 workalike.

    Ron - from years ago.... But not on graflex.org - from the work on "Go for Launch"

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Art;

    We used both 5x7 and larger aerial cameras for what looked like (to the eye) to be motion picture footage.

    This looks very similar to that, even to the general edge markings. I would guess that this came from either a 5x7 aerial camera running full speed, or if they had one, a 4x5 workalike.

    Ron - from years ago.... But not on graflex.org - from the work on "Go for Launch"
    Hi Ron,

    Nice to make contact again! I use the term movie (motion picture) film for lack of any other nomenclature in my brain. I assume 4x5 as that is the measured dimensions on my "contact" print 1:1. I am still trying to learn more about the films and cameras that made many images I own possible.
    My US Army photo lab used to contact print 9-in aerial recon film so I am
    aware of that size. Thanks for the reply. PS my recollection is I met you
    on graflex.org and then we did additional discussions on the book.

    Art

  4. #14
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    Art, it was via a post on Photo Net actually. Been a long time.

    The image you have is 5" aerial film with the normal 5x7 changed due to a mask to get 4x5 by rotating the image 90 degrees. This gives a small increase in the number of frams per roll and a small frame rate increase.

    PE

  5. #15
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    Looks kinda like what you get with a K20 or similar aerial recon camera. I have one and it can shoot 5" roll film. Has a vacuum back with a pattern similar to what I see on those shots- three rounded rectangular openings to one side.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  6. #16
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    Here is a blackberry shot of the 4x5" film back in my k20...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG00192.jpg  
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Looks kinda like what you get with a K20 or similar aerial recon camera. I have one and it can shoot 5" roll film. Has a vacuum back with a pattern similar to what I see on those shots- three rounded rectangular openings to one side.

    Keith,

    Can you determine what transports the film? Rollers and if so what material?
    Thanks.....

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Art, it was via a post on Photo Net actually. Been a long time.

    The image you have is 5" aerial film with the normal 5x7 changed due to a mask to get 4x5 by rotating the image 90 degrees. This gives a small increase in the number of frams per roll and a small frame rate increase.

    PE
    Thanks, Ron. My recollection must have slipped! Masking was probably
    needed but a waste of film area. I wonder if the lens was replaced for the
    smaller format......

    Art

  9. #19
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    Yep it's just plain rollers. The film doesn't have to be perfed, although what I have is double perfed. You can cock and advance at a rate of about 1 frame per sec. The lens on my k20 is a kodak anastigmat 161mm f/4.5. The vac back mechanism is quite impressive, it holds the film very flat and there is no need of an external vacuum line.

    Mind you, the frame doesn't quite match what you are showing, so I'd say it's similar but not identical. What is strange in your contact print is that the three rounded rectangles are not of equal dimension, so that would seem to support Ron's comment about a ~5x7 or such, shooting two side-by-side 4x5 frames with some kind of mask.

    Anyway on my k20 back, the exposed film area is quite exactly 4x5", so the actual roll film was a bit larger than that.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #20

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    For those that can to the crossed-eye stereo viewing trick, try it on this photo. The foreground, the clouds, and the light post all line up, but then the rocket is all funky since it is moving from frame to frame.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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