Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,932   Posts: 1,522,193   Online: 1101
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    98

    Making the leap to LF

    Hello all, I have been lurking here for awhile and have been absorbing as much information on LF as I can before I started asking questions. Most of the photography I am interested in is outdoors, little studio work so I thought a foldable camera would be best. I like hiking and architecture and am drawn to this style of photography. Both my wife and I (she is budding pro photographer and I like gadgets...) are into photography and have recently started shooting film again. I cant stand digital and it has nothing to do with not likely tech, it has to do with the time warp that occurs when I strap a computer on and I just lost 6-8 hours of a day and not really knowing what I did for that lost time...

    Anyway, I just read this on Ebony's site: http://www.ebonycamera.com/articles/fold.exp.html

    Sorry for the delay up front but a bit about my self I guess helps. So my question: For the type of photography I like which type of camera should I research, foldable or non-folding?

    Thanks for the help

    ./e

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by 77seriesiii View Post
    I like hiking and architecture and am drawn to this style of photography.
    Styles, you mean Hiking and architecture represent the two equipment extremes of LF. The former is often done with a lightweight, folding field camera with limited movements and lenses with just-adequate coverage; convertible lenses are often just fine for this sort of thing. Architecture usually calls for a heavy monorail camera, perhaps with bag bellows, capability to do pretzelbellows movements, and substantial lenses with big image circles to make use of that flexibility.

    I think you need to decide for yourself which of those camps you'd fit into, most of the time. Frankly, I am not much a fan of the one-camera-does-it-all approach... just decide whether you want a field or technical for now, and you'll buy the other one eventually anyway

    P.S. I should hasten to add, you can do landscape with monorail and architecture with a folding camera... you really can. But there are good reasons why these are two separate camps in LF.
    Last edited by keithwms; 02-01-2009 at 02:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    I would, of course, begin with the camera. I would check the reviews and, as Keith points out, get something light if you have ANY intention of hitting the trails with it. The second thing I would look at would be stability. Go for as light weight as you possibly can but do not skimp on sturdiness. A slight breeze comes up and that bread box you're hauling around would dance in the breeze on a lesser tripod making perfect focus nigh immposible. Thirdly I would look to lenses. View camera has a great size comparison between formats so you could take your 35mm a-typical focal lengths and fin a more-or less-LF equivalent.

    Word to the wise, there are deals to be had but be prepared to start shelling out some major league moolah.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    98
    Damn, this will be painful then as we are in the big city as much as we are in the woods. I live in Germany have the forest/vineyards in my backyard and 3 major cities under 40 minutes to chose from. I understand the one doesnt do everything approach and if you attempt it there will be a compromise of one over the other. Of the two types foldable vs non, which is the better, ok read easier, to learn LF basics? I am probably 6 months from buying a camera and am trying to get as informed prior to purchase, to make sure I get what I want out of the equipment. I think I have a retired military guy in the area that is film pro and I will be hitting him up for suggestions/help he just doesnt know it yet. ;-) I'm not worried about the weight of the equipment did a lot of carrying large rucks/equipment in woods, so the foldable vs non is not a weight issue I guess it is the using the right tool for the job issue.

    Thnx

    ./e

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    98
    Sturdiness I am ok with, winds do get preeetttty steep so a solid camera is something I am looking for. Tripod wise, I have a bogen/manfrotti that doubles as a war club bought it for a DSLR and it was overkill, almost never used it but would easily hold a LF camera. I think the head (pan n tilt) can take 15-18lbs and weighs 12...like I said I bought when i was younger and wasnt thinking clearly...a girl was involved (wife...mine ;-)

    ./e
    Last edited by 77seriesiii; 02-01-2009 at 03:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,082
    Images
    189
    Not knowing your budget, but assuming you don't own your own country, I'd start with a less than top dollar camera. The Ebony is royalty; the Shen Hao is working class, and like a good worker, gets the job done nicely. That way you can save for some seriously good glass in the focal lengths you find you choose most often (wide, normal, short tele, or long). There's also the matter of what you expect to do with the negatives/trannies you shoot. Will you be enlarging your own negs, contact printing, or scanning and printing d********y? Except for contact printing, the other options can be costly as you may already realize. OTOH, perhaps you do own your own country in which case you should disregard everything I just wrote and spend like crazy!
    John Voss

    My Blog

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    98
    no dont own my own country. But we do own an Epson 7600 (22inch roll printer) so that may help. I dont own an enlarger yet but after a turn or two will go that route. I will start with developing the negatives and then scan or maybe borrow equipment time from a soon to be acquaintance (the guy I mentioned earlier...). I have taken a look at a few of the camera places KEH and Mid-West Exchange are the only ones to date. I know that good glass is important and that is where I need to sink the first big money. the camera will need to be a sound solid performer. I am not sure on ePray, yes a good deal can be found, but the buyer beware risk runs high with little recourse.
    But as stated earlier, too soon for me to be salivating on camera name (but I already am...), still more to read and information to collect. thanks for the tip on the Shen Hao, I hadnt heard that name yet so I will look into them.

    ./e

  8. #8
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Since it sounds like an inexpensive camera is possibly in the works then there's no reason not to cruise ebay for a bargain basement, get you started kind of camera. I am currently on my first camera, someone's hand-me-down homemade camera. I fashioned a new base for it to make it more solid and my wife got me a transit tripod for Christmas. Bigger, more solid and I was able to expoxy a 5/8"-11 hex nut into a hole in the base I made so that I could affix the camera to the tripod. I think I got started LF for under $350.00 USD all told, including Arista.edu 4x5 sheet film from www.freestylephoto.biz I even picked up an old Alice LC-1 ODG backpack on ebay for the occasion of lugging it around.

    So to just get the hang of it it doesn't have to be QUITE so painful. Once you get the feel for the large format photography and find your niche, where you want to go, you might have a little more direction to work from.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    554
    Images
    17
    I agree with all the above posts. My first LF camera was a studio type (Sinar F2) that I lugged around EVERYWHERE in it's case...Roughly 40lbs of stuff. Mountains, on the back of my mountain bike, etc. You can make anything work - its just a matter of how 'inspired' you really are.
    The biggest thing that I would concern myself with is getting a good tripod; because you will need that regardless of the sort of camera you use. Beyond that; get something cheap and take it from there.
    As for myself; I just (today !) bought my second LF camera...But more on that later. I have been looking on ebay and there are a BUNCH of calumet and cambo 4x5 cams on there pretty cheap. Might be worth a look.

  10. #10
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Welcome back, Steve.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin